Arrivals - Going to Try a New Tactic

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Generic

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Like many of you, we have a problem with guest arrivals. We have never really been strict about it, instead we mold our day around the guest arrivals.
Well, yesterday's 2PM didn't arrive and at 5PM we calls only to be pushed back to 8PM and well it was enough. So last night we redid the reminder letter for the guests. We are moving our business phone to our cell phone. And we have decided that after 6PM it's going to be self check-in. Maybe it will take us a while to get it right, get the paperwork done and streamline it, but it has to be done. Regular check-in will be 3PM to 6PM.
So, here is my question. What have you done already that you can suggest that we do to streamline the process of self check-in. We have a door with a keycode, so we can give them the code ahead of time. We can program that garage door as well. But we still have to do some learning to get this right.
We would appreciate all suggestion. As always, we won't impliment them all, but we do appreciate the feedback that will help us get to where we want to be and get back some of our lives.
 

Don Draper

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Firstly: GOOD FOR YOU!!! We got super strict with this 2 years ago and have never looked back. After 6 pm (and actually I am now changing it to 5 pm, expecting to be here 'til 6 but hoping to avoid the ones who rush in at 5:55), you're getting a note.
We have it on our policies and on our confirmation email. It says "Arrangements must be made for self check-in after 6 pm, please let us know at the time you make your reservation. Late check-ins not pre-arranged are subject to $25 fee (and I have NEVER charged this fee but it gets them to at least CALL you).
When we do self check-in, we leave the key and a welcome note that gives instructions on how to access their room, how to adjust heat/AC in their room, how the lock works, what time breakfast is, what time coffee is out, where the fridge/ice machine/wine glasses are. We include a map of town. We keep a template for each of our guest rooms on the computer because the directions on how to get the room and the lock bit are different for each room. So you just customize the template with the guests' names each time you need to print one.
What has helped us very much is having a basically EXHAUSTIVE binder of guest information in each room, including not only Inn info (like how to use the WiFi, access the porch, etc.) but dining, touring, shopping recommendations as well.
 

JBloggs

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My checkins were 1145PM last night (this after all day, full house checkout and work work work yesterday), and 7am breakfast. Telling them to let us know in advance, doesnt work, asking them to call doesn't work. These are people we are dealing with, be glad they are not your employees!
We do self check ins, they get here when they get here, BUT this is not as easy if they are from overseas...you have more overseas guests then we do, we have a couple frorm France this evening (easy for you to write a note in French, not easy for me) :) They will be lost, disorientated and arrive late, I can already determine that.
 

Generic

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Firstly: GOOD FOR YOU!!! We got super strict with this 2 years ago and have never looked back. After 6 pm (and actually I am now changing it to 5 pm, expecting to be here 'til 6 but hoping to avoid the ones who rush in at 5:55), you're getting a note.
We have it on our policies and on our confirmation email. It says "Arrangements must be made for self check-in after 6 pm, please let us know at the time you make your reservation. Late check-ins not pre-arranged are subject to $25 fee (and I have NEVER charged this fee but it gets them to at least CALL you).
When we do self check-in, we leave the key and a welcome note that gives instructions on how to access their room, how to adjust heat/AC in their room, how the lock works, what time breakfast is, what time coffee is out, where the fridge/ice machine/wine glasses are. We include a map of town. We keep a template for each of our guest rooms on the computer because the directions on how to get the room and the lock bit are different for each room. So you just customize the template with the guests' names each time you need to print one.
What has helped us very much is having a basically EXHAUSTIVE binder of guest information in each room, including not only Inn info (like how to use the WiFi, access the porch, etc.) but dining, touring, shopping recommendations as well..
Thank you. We haven't added it to our reservation form, yet. Just the reminder. I guess I will start to work on getting that everywhere.
We've been working on a binder for the rooms, but we have to do it in two languages, so it takes a bit more time to assemble.
 

Generic

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My checkins were 1145PM last night (this after all day, full house checkout and work work work yesterday), and 7am breakfast. Telling them to let us know in advance, doesnt work, asking them to call doesn't work. These are people we are dealing with, be glad they are not your employees!
We do self check ins, they get here when they get here, BUT this is not as easy if they are from overseas...you have more overseas guests then we do, we have a couple frorm France this evening (easy for you to write a note in French, not easy for me) :) They will be lost, disorientated and arrive late, I can already determine that..
Well, start a new thread with sentences innkeepers need to know in French and we can try to fill them in for you and other innkeepers. And if we need to, we will give you the Quebec French and the France French terms, if they differ.
For example, in Quebec we pronounce it "why-fhy", just like in English, but in France it's pronounced "whee-fhee" like in the musical note "mi".
 

Alibi Ike

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Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name.
 

Alibi Ike

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My checkins were 1145PM last night (this after all day, full house checkout and work work work yesterday), and 7am breakfast. Telling them to let us know in advance, doesnt work, asking them to call doesn't work. These are people we are dealing with, be glad they are not your employees!
We do self check ins, they get here when they get here, BUT this is not as easy if they are from overseas...you have more overseas guests then we do, we have a couple frorm France this evening (easy for you to write a note in French, not easy for me) :) They will be lost, disorientated and arrive late, I can already determine that..
Well, start a new thread with sentences innkeepers need to know in French and we can try to fill them in for you and other innkeepers. And if we need to, we will give you the Quebec French and the France French terms, if they differ.
For example, in Quebec we pronounce it "why-fhy", just like in English, but in France it's pronounced "whee-fhee" like in the musical note "mi".
.
Because I don't want guests assuming I speak another language, I'm gonna stick with English.
 

Generic

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Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name..
Alibi Ike said:
Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name.
Generally we contact people by email, unless things go awry. And being that we have guests from all over, calls aren't always helpful (and the hours can be a problem, because you don't know what time zone they are in.) For example, a few days ago we had an arrival from Turkey, but they were in Vancouver at the time... that's 7/8 hours earlier to 3 hours later... So, a noon call would be 7/8PM in Turkey, but 9AM in Vancouver.
 

Don Draper

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Firstly: GOOD FOR YOU!!! We got super strict with this 2 years ago and have never looked back. After 6 pm (and actually I am now changing it to 5 pm, expecting to be here 'til 6 but hoping to avoid the ones who rush in at 5:55), you're getting a note.
We have it on our policies and on our confirmation email. It says "Arrangements must be made for self check-in after 6 pm, please let us know at the time you make your reservation. Late check-ins not pre-arranged are subject to $25 fee (and I have NEVER charged this fee but it gets them to at least CALL you).
When we do self check-in, we leave the key and a welcome note that gives instructions on how to access their room, how to adjust heat/AC in their room, how the lock works, what time breakfast is, what time coffee is out, where the fridge/ice machine/wine glasses are. We include a map of town. We keep a template for each of our guest rooms on the computer because the directions on how to get the room and the lock bit are different for each room. So you just customize the template with the guests' names each time you need to print one.
What has helped us very much is having a basically EXHAUSTIVE binder of guest information in each room, including not only Inn info (like how to use the WiFi, access the porch, etc.) but dining, touring, shopping recommendations as well..
Thank you. We haven't added it to our reservation form, yet. Just the reminder. I guess I will start to work on getting that everywhere.
We've been working on a binder for the rooms, but we have to do it in two languages, so it takes a bit more time to assemble.
.
Yes, that was very time consuming. Took DH about 3 months one winter to get it where he wanted it (but he is an engineer and a *bit* anal, so that was him). Two languages, OY!
 

Alibi Ike

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Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name..
Alibi Ike said:
Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name.
Generally we contact people by email, unless things go awry. And being that we have guests from all over, calls aren't always helpful (and the hours can be a problem, because you don't know what time zone they are in.) For example, a few days ago we had an arrival from Turkey, but they were in Vancouver at the time... that's 7/8 hours earlier to 3 hours later... So, a noon call would be 7/8PM in Turkey, but 9AM in Vancouver.
.
I was curious about the contact as I didn't think you were going to leave the info stuck to the front door. Our problem with late arrivals is they very frequently do not let us know they are planning to be late (or are unexpectedly delayed). And no one gets the code to come in the house until I've been paid. (Because sometimes the late arrivals are early leavers and their cc's are no good.)
 

Generic

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Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name..
Alibi Ike said:
Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name.
Generally we contact people by email, unless things go awry. And being that we have guests from all over, calls aren't always helpful (and the hours can be a problem, because you don't know what time zone they are in.) For example, a few days ago we had an arrival from Turkey, but they were in Vancouver at the time... that's 7/8 hours earlier to 3 hours later... So, a noon call would be 7/8PM in Turkey, but 9AM in Vancouver.
.
I was curious about the contact as I didn't think you were going to leave the info stuck to the front door. Our problem with late arrivals is they very frequently do not let us know they are planning to be late (or are unexpectedly delayed). And no one gets the code to come in the house until I've been paid. (Because sometimes the late arrivals are early leavers and their cc's are no good.)
.
We have had to resort to a note on the door from time to time. With our door lock it's easy enough to set the code to...
  • their 8, 7, 6 or 5 digit telephone number
  • the last 4 digits of their credit card
  • the last 4 digits of their telephone number
  • their postal code
  • their address number
  • a combination of their address number, apartment number and zip code
  • etc.
All of which they can usually remember, though you wouldn't believe how many people actually have to turn on their own cell phone to get their own telephone number.
 

gillumhouse

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Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name..
Alibi Ike said:
Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name.
Generally we contact people by email, unless things go awry. And being that we have guests from all over, calls aren't always helpful (and the hours can be a problem, because you don't know what time zone they are in.) For example, a few days ago we had an arrival from Turkey, but they were in Vancouver at the time... that's 7/8 hours earlier to 3 hours later... So, a noon call would be 7/8PM in Turkey, but 9AM in Vancouver.
.
I was curious about the contact as I didn't think you were going to leave the info stuck to the front door. Our problem with late arrivals is they very frequently do not let us know they are planning to be late (or are unexpectedly delayed). And no one gets the code to come in the house until I've been paid. (Because sometimes the late arrivals are early leavers and their cc's are no good.)
.
We have had to resort to a note on the door from time to time. With our door lock it's easy enough to set the code to...
  • their 8, 7, 6 or 5 digit telephone number
  • the last 4 digits of their credit card
  • the last 4 digits of their telephone number
  • their postal code
  • their address number
  • a combination of their address number, apartment number and zip code
  • etc.
All of which they can usually remember, though you wouldn't believe how many people actually have to turn on their own cell phone to get their own telephone number.
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
We have had to resort to a note on the door from time to time. With our door lock it's easy enough to set the code to...
  • their 8, 7, 6 or 5 digit telephone number
  • the last 4 digits of their credit card
  • the last 4 digits of their telephone number
  • their postal code
  • their address number
  • a combination of their address number, apartment number and zip code
  • etc.
All of which they can usually remember, though you wouldn't believe how many people actually have to turn on their own cell phone to get their own telephone number.
It is not unusual for people to not know their own phone number - they do not call it! It took DH a LONG time to remember our WV number - he had the Illinois number for over 20 years. He still does not always remember our zip code.
 

Alibi Ike

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Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name..
Alibi Ike said:
Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name.
Generally we contact people by email, unless things go awry. And being that we have guests from all over, calls aren't always helpful (and the hours can be a problem, because you don't know what time zone they are in.) For example, a few days ago we had an arrival from Turkey, but they were in Vancouver at the time... that's 7/8 hours earlier to 3 hours later... So, a noon call would be 7/8PM in Turkey, but 9AM in Vancouver.
.
I was curious about the contact as I didn't think you were going to leave the info stuck to the front door. Our problem with late arrivals is they very frequently do not let us know they are planning to be late (or are unexpectedly delayed). And no one gets the code to come in the house until I've been paid. (Because sometimes the late arrivals are early leavers and their cc's are no good.)
.
We have had to resort to a note on the door from time to time. With our door lock it's easy enough to set the code to...
  • their 8, 7, 6 or 5 digit telephone number
  • the last 4 digits of their credit card
  • the last 4 digits of their telephone number
  • their postal code
  • their address number
  • a combination of their address number, apartment number and zip code
  • etc.
All of which they can usually remember, though you wouldn't believe how many people actually have to turn on their own cell phone to get their own telephone number.
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
We have had to resort to a note on the door from time to time. With our door lock it's easy enough to set the code to...
  • their 8, 7, 6 or 5 digit telephone number
  • the last 4 digits of their credit card
  • the last 4 digits of their telephone number
  • their postal code
  • their address number
  • a combination of their address number, apartment number and zip code
  • etc.
All of which they can usually remember, though you wouldn't believe how many people actually have to turn on their own cell phone to get their own telephone number.
It is not unusual for people to not know their own phone number - they do not call it! It took DH a LONG time to remember our WV number - he had the Illinois number for over 20 years. He still does not always remember our zip code.
.
I have found here, especially with walk-ins, that a hefty % of guys do not know their own address. They'll say, '1234 Wisteria Lane' and I'll hear a little 'ahem' in the background and '4321 Wisteria Lane'. Ditto zip codes/postal codes and phone numbers. One guy barked at me, 'How often do you think I call myself?' I want to ask, 'And apparently no one ever asks for your number, either, do they?' you old curmudgeon!
I have yet to have a woman guest stumble over her address.
The worst excuse I ever heard was, 'I don't spend a lot of time there,' from a husband who didn't know where he lived.
 

JBloggs

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Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name..
Alibi Ike said:
Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name.
Generally we contact people by email, unless things go awry. And being that we have guests from all over, calls aren't always helpful (and the hours can be a problem, because you don't know what time zone they are in.) For example, a few days ago we had an arrival from Turkey, but they were in Vancouver at the time... that's 7/8 hours earlier to 3 hours later... So, a noon call would be 7/8PM in Turkey, but 9AM in Vancouver.
.
I was curious about the contact as I didn't think you were going to leave the info stuck to the front door. Our problem with late arrivals is they very frequently do not let us know they are planning to be late (or are unexpectedly delayed). And no one gets the code to come in the house until I've been paid. (Because sometimes the late arrivals are early leavers and their cc's are no good.)
.
We have had to resort to a note on the door from time to time. With our door lock it's easy enough to set the code to...
  • their 8, 7, 6 or 5 digit telephone number
  • the last 4 digits of their credit card
  • the last 4 digits of their telephone number
  • their postal code
  • their address number
  • a combination of their address number, apartment number and zip code
  • etc.
All of which they can usually remember, though you wouldn't believe how many people actually have to turn on their own cell phone to get their own telephone number.
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
We have had to resort to a note on the door from time to time. With our door lock it's easy enough to set the code to...
  • their 8, 7, 6 or 5 digit telephone number
  • the last 4 digits of their credit card
  • the last 4 digits of their telephone number
  • their postal code
  • their address number
  • a combination of their address number, apartment number and zip code
  • etc.
All of which they can usually remember, though you wouldn't believe how many people actually have to turn on their own cell phone to get their own telephone number.
It is not unusual for people to not know their own phone number - they do not call it! It took DH a LONG time to remember our WV number - he had the Illinois number for over 20 years. He still does not always remember our zip code.
.
I have found here, especially with walk-ins, that a hefty % of guys do not know their own address. They'll say, '1234 Wisteria Lane' and I'll hear a little 'ahem' in the background and '4321 Wisteria Lane'. Ditto zip codes/postal codes and phone numbers. One guy barked at me, 'How often do you think I call myself?' I want to ask, 'And apparently no one ever asks for your number, either, do they?' you old curmudgeon!
I have yet to have a woman guest stumble over her address.
The worst excuse I ever heard was, 'I don't spend a lot of time there,' from a husband who didn't know where he lived.
.
Better yet ask them their anniversary date. LOL!

 

Alibi Ike

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Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name..
Alibi Ike said:
Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name.
Generally we contact people by email, unless things go awry. And being that we have guests from all over, calls aren't always helpful (and the hours can be a problem, because you don't know what time zone they are in.) For example, a few days ago we had an arrival from Turkey, but they were in Vancouver at the time... that's 7/8 hours earlier to 3 hours later... So, a noon call would be 7/8PM in Turkey, but 9AM in Vancouver.
.
I was curious about the contact as I didn't think you were going to leave the info stuck to the front door. Our problem with late arrivals is they very frequently do not let us know they are planning to be late (or are unexpectedly delayed). And no one gets the code to come in the house until I've been paid. (Because sometimes the late arrivals are early leavers and their cc's are no good.)
.
We have had to resort to a note on the door from time to time. With our door lock it's easy enough to set the code to...
  • their 8, 7, 6 or 5 digit telephone number
  • the last 4 digits of their credit card
  • the last 4 digits of their telephone number
  • their postal code
  • their address number
  • a combination of their address number, apartment number and zip code
  • etc.
All of which they can usually remember, though you wouldn't believe how many people actually have to turn on their own cell phone to get their own telephone number.
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
We have had to resort to a note on the door from time to time. With our door lock it's easy enough to set the code to...
  • their 8, 7, 6 or 5 digit telephone number
  • the last 4 digits of their credit card
  • the last 4 digits of their telephone number
  • their postal code
  • their address number
  • a combination of their address number, apartment number and zip code
  • etc.
All of which they can usually remember, though you wouldn't believe how many people actually have to turn on their own cell phone to get their own telephone number.
It is not unusual for people to not know their own phone number - they do not call it! It took DH a LONG time to remember our WV number - he had the Illinois number for over 20 years. He still does not always remember our zip code.
.
Double post.
 

Alibi Ike

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Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name..
Alibi Ike said:
Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name.
Generally we contact people by email, unless things go awry. And being that we have guests from all over, calls aren't always helpful (and the hours can be a problem, because you don't know what time zone they are in.) For example, a few days ago we had an arrival from Turkey, but they were in Vancouver at the time... that's 7/8 hours earlier to 3 hours later... So, a noon call would be 7/8PM in Turkey, but 9AM in Vancouver.
.
I was curious about the contact as I didn't think you were going to leave the info stuck to the front door. Our problem with late arrivals is they very frequently do not let us know they are planning to be late (or are unexpectedly delayed). And no one gets the code to come in the house until I've been paid. (Because sometimes the late arrivals are early leavers and their cc's are no good.)
.
We have had to resort to a note on the door from time to time. With our door lock it's easy enough to set the code to...
  • their 8, 7, 6 or 5 digit telephone number
  • the last 4 digits of their credit card
  • the last 4 digits of their telephone number
  • their postal code
  • their address number
  • a combination of their address number, apartment number and zip code
  • etc.
All of which they can usually remember, though you wouldn't believe how many people actually have to turn on their own cell phone to get their own telephone number.
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
We have had to resort to a note on the door from time to time. With our door lock it's easy enough to set the code to...
  • their 8, 7, 6 or 5 digit telephone number
  • the last 4 digits of their credit card
  • the last 4 digits of their telephone number
  • their postal code
  • their address number
  • a combination of their address number, apartment number and zip code
  • etc.
All of which they can usually remember, though you wouldn't believe how many people actually have to turn on their own cell phone to get their own telephone number.
It is not unusual for people to not know their own phone number - they do not call it! It took DH a LONG time to remember our WV number - he had the Illinois number for over 20 years. He still does not always remember our zip code.
.
I have found here, especially with walk-ins, that a hefty % of guys do not know their own address. They'll say, '1234 Wisteria Lane' and I'll hear a little 'ahem' in the background and '4321 Wisteria Lane'. Ditto zip codes/postal codes and phone numbers. One guy barked at me, 'How often do you think I call myself?' I want to ask, 'And apparently no one ever asks for your number, either, do they?' you old curmudgeon!
I have yet to have a woman guest stumble over her address.
The worst excuse I ever heard was, 'I don't spend a lot of time there,' from a husband who didn't know where he lived.
.
Better yet ask them their anniversary date. LOL!

.
Joey Bloggs said:
Better yet ask them their anniversary date. LOL!
We took care of that one right off...it's inscribed on the inside of our wedding bands! (Along with the spouse's name, just in case...)
 

Flower

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For those people that forget numbers ask them for their birthday and year and month. They can always remember thoses numbers.Then keying in should or could be easy!
 

Generic

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Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name..
Alibi Ike said:
Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name.
Generally we contact people by email, unless things go awry. And being that we have guests from all over, calls aren't always helpful (and the hours can be a problem, because you don't know what time zone they are in.) For example, a few days ago we had an arrival from Turkey, but they were in Vancouver at the time... that's 7/8 hours earlier to 3 hours later... So, a noon call would be 7/8PM in Turkey, but 9AM in Vancouver.
.
I was curious about the contact as I didn't think you were going to leave the info stuck to the front door. Our problem with late arrivals is they very frequently do not let us know they are planning to be late (or are unexpectedly delayed). And no one gets the code to come in the house until I've been paid. (Because sometimes the late arrivals are early leavers and their cc's are no good.)
.
We have had to resort to a note on the door from time to time. With our door lock it's easy enough to set the code to...
  • their 8, 7, 6 or 5 digit telephone number
  • the last 4 digits of their credit card
  • the last 4 digits of their telephone number
  • their postal code
  • their address number
  • a combination of their address number, apartment number and zip code
  • etc.
All of which they can usually remember, though you wouldn't believe how many people actually have to turn on their own cell phone to get their own telephone number.
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
We have had to resort to a note on the door from time to time. With our door lock it's easy enough to set the code to...
  • their 8, 7, 6 or 5 digit telephone number
  • the last 4 digits of their credit card
  • the last 4 digits of their telephone number
  • their postal code
  • their address number
  • a combination of their address number, apartment number and zip code
  • etc.
All of which they can usually remember, though you wouldn't believe how many people actually have to turn on their own cell phone to get their own telephone number.
It is not unusual for people to not know their own phone number - they do not call it! It took DH a LONG time to remember our WV number - he had the Illinois number for over 20 years. He still does not always remember our zip code.
.
I have found here, especially with walk-ins, that a hefty % of guys do not know their own address. They'll say, '1234 Wisteria Lane' and I'll hear a little 'ahem' in the background and '4321 Wisteria Lane'. Ditto zip codes/postal codes and phone numbers. One guy barked at me, 'How often do you think I call myself?' I want to ask, 'And apparently no one ever asks for your number, either, do they?' you old curmudgeon!
I have yet to have a woman guest stumble over her address.
The worst excuse I ever heard was, 'I don't spend a lot of time there,' from a husband who didn't know where he lived.
.
Better yet ask them their anniversary date. LOL!

.
Joey Bloggs said:
Better yet ask them their anniversary date. LOL!
We took care of that one right off...it's inscribed on the inside of our wedding bands! (Along with the spouse's name, just in case...)
.
You were afraid of not remembering your spouse's name?
 

JBloggs

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Joined
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Messages
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Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name..
Alibi Ike said:
Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name.
Generally we contact people by email, unless things go awry. And being that we have guests from all over, calls aren't always helpful (and the hours can be a problem, because you don't know what time zone they are in.) For example, a few days ago we had an arrival from Turkey, but they were in Vancouver at the time... that's 7/8 hours earlier to 3 hours later... So, a noon call would be 7/8PM in Turkey, but 9AM in Vancouver.
.
I was curious about the contact as I didn't think you were going to leave the info stuck to the front door. Our problem with late arrivals is they very frequently do not let us know they are planning to be late (or are unexpectedly delayed). And no one gets the code to come in the house until I've been paid. (Because sometimes the late arrivals are early leavers and their cc's are no good.)
.
We have had to resort to a note on the door from time to time. With our door lock it's easy enough to set the code to...
  • their 8, 7, 6 or 5 digit telephone number
  • the last 4 digits of their credit card
  • the last 4 digits of their telephone number
  • their postal code
  • their address number
  • a combination of their address number, apartment number and zip code
  • etc.
All of which they can usually remember, though you wouldn't believe how many people actually have to turn on their own cell phone to get their own telephone number.
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
We have had to resort to a note on the door from time to time. With our door lock it's easy enough to set the code to...
  • their 8, 7, 6 or 5 digit telephone number
  • the last 4 digits of their credit card
  • the last 4 digits of their telephone number
  • their postal code
  • their address number
  • a combination of their address number, apartment number and zip code
  • etc.
All of which they can usually remember, though you wouldn't believe how many people actually have to turn on their own cell phone to get their own telephone number.
It is not unusual for people to not know their own phone number - they do not call it! It took DH a LONG time to remember our WV number - he had the Illinois number for over 20 years. He still does not always remember our zip code.
.
I have found here, especially with walk-ins, that a hefty % of guys do not know their own address. They'll say, '1234 Wisteria Lane' and I'll hear a little 'ahem' in the background and '4321 Wisteria Lane'. Ditto zip codes/postal codes and phone numbers. One guy barked at me, 'How often do you think I call myself?' I want to ask, 'And apparently no one ever asks for your number, either, do they?' you old curmudgeon!
I have yet to have a woman guest stumble over her address.
The worst excuse I ever heard was, 'I don't spend a lot of time there,' from a husband who didn't know where he lived.
.
Better yet ask them their anniversary date. LOL!

.
Joey Bloggs said:
Better yet ask them their anniversary date. LOL!
We took care of that one right off...it's inscribed on the inside of our wedding bands! (Along with the spouse's name, just in case...)
.
You were afraid of not remembering your spouse's name?
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
You were afraid of not remembering your spouse's name?
Either that or put a collar on them.
I knew a woman who was a Debra Miller the third wife of one Jim Miller, he married two Deborah's prior to her. I wondered if that was the same issue. LOL
 

Generic

Well-known member
Joined
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Messages
7,612
Reaction score
124
Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name..
Alibi Ike said:
Are you going to contact the guests by phone with the door code? If so, what you can do then is to have a welcome note waiting inside for them directing them to their room. We tell guests what time breakfast is and what nearby restaurants are open until 11. There is an explanation to help themselves to coffee or tea and a snack.
I've got each room saved in a file and I print it off, write the guest's name at the top and pop it in an envelope with their name.
Generally we contact people by email, unless things go awry. And being that we have guests from all over, calls aren't always helpful (and the hours can be a problem, because you don't know what time zone they are in.) For example, a few days ago we had an arrival from Turkey, but they were in Vancouver at the time... that's 7/8 hours earlier to 3 hours later... So, a noon call would be 7/8PM in Turkey, but 9AM in Vancouver.
.
I was curious about the contact as I didn't think you were going to leave the info stuck to the front door. Our problem with late arrivals is they very frequently do not let us know they are planning to be late (or are unexpectedly delayed). And no one gets the code to come in the house until I've been paid. (Because sometimes the late arrivals are early leavers and their cc's are no good.)
.
We have had to resort to a note on the door from time to time. With our door lock it's easy enough to set the code to...
  • their 8, 7, 6 or 5 digit telephone number
  • the last 4 digits of their credit card
  • the last 4 digits of their telephone number
  • their postal code
  • their address number
  • a combination of their address number, apartment number and zip code
  • etc.
All of which they can usually remember, though you wouldn't believe how many people actually have to turn on their own cell phone to get their own telephone number.
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
We have had to resort to a note on the door from time to time. With our door lock it's easy enough to set the code to...
  • their 8, 7, 6 or 5 digit telephone number
  • the last 4 digits of their credit card
  • the last 4 digits of their telephone number
  • their postal code
  • their address number
  • a combination of their address number, apartment number and zip code
  • etc.
All of which they can usually remember, though you wouldn't believe how many people actually have to turn on their own cell phone to get their own telephone number.
It is not unusual for people to not know their own phone number - they do not call it! It took DH a LONG time to remember our WV number - he had the Illinois number for over 20 years. He still does not always remember our zip code.
.
I have found here, especially with walk-ins, that a hefty % of guys do not know their own address. They'll say, '1234 Wisteria Lane' and I'll hear a little 'ahem' in the background and '4321 Wisteria Lane'. Ditto zip codes/postal codes and phone numbers. One guy barked at me, 'How often do you think I call myself?' I want to ask, 'And apparently no one ever asks for your number, either, do they?' you old curmudgeon!
I have yet to have a woman guest stumble over her address.
The worst excuse I ever heard was, 'I don't spend a lot of time there,' from a husband who didn't know where he lived.
.
Better yet ask them their anniversary date. LOL!

.
Joey Bloggs said:
Better yet ask them their anniversary date. LOL!
We took care of that one right off...it's inscribed on the inside of our wedding bands! (Along with the spouse's name, just in case...)
.
You were afraid of not remembering your spouse's name?
.
Eric Arthur Blair said:
You were afraid of not remembering your spouse's name?
Either that or put a collar on them.
I knew a woman who was a Debra Miller the third wife of one Jim Miller, he married two Deborah's prior to her. I wondered if that was the same issue. LOL
.
Taking recycling to a whole new level.....
Of course, that would be so much HARDER to do around here, he would need to find someone already named Debra Miller.... you keep your maiden name around here, by law since 1981. (Anyone can change their name through the legal process for a name change. Marriage isn't a legal process for a name change.)
Or do you think he did it just so he wouldn't have that akward moment when you call out someone's name during sex and you don't want to yell out the wrong name? :D
 
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