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Samster

Well-known member
Joined
May 30, 2008
Messages
6,475
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South Carolina
Wow. So sorry you were caught off guard with this. So glad you posted this, though. It will help us tremendously. And, Swirt, thanks for posting the ADA Regulations.
What struck me was the question in the ADA Regs:
"I have alway had a clearly posted "no pets" policy at my establishment. Do I still have to allow service animals?
The answer in said Regs was:
Yes. A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your no pets policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disablilty. This does not mean you must abandon your "no pet policy" altogether.....
I think the key word here is "MODIFY". Draw your own conclusions. The Regs say that "A service animal is not a pet".
Now I have a question. If one does not allow dogs, and someone checks in with a service animal, am I not allowed to charge for the service animal?
I don't allow animals, so I don't charge other animals.
Am I to understand since I don't have official fees for animals at my inn (because I don't allow them) then I would not be allowed to charge for a service animal?
Riki
.
Don't know. The ADA Regs doesn't address fees, as far as I can see.
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
But, these Regs are so wide open to interpretation. If you look at the BIG picture, how many times will we have guests show up with a dog? It's not something to worry about.
But just know the rules.
We've never had a handicapped couple. But does "handicapped" mean "disabled?"
IF, IF, a couple does want to bring service dog, MOST will let us know beforehand. I think Bree was an exception.
.
I agree with Swirt... It says right in those Q&As regarding service animals that the Federal regs supercede any local & State regulations. If you had someone with a service animal show up at your door, you would not be able to deny them lodging. And you might be surprised that someone with a service animal would not even think about letting you know beforehand that they have one, as they are not required to notify you.
I do wonder if in this instance with Bree's guest if this was a bonafide service animal or if they were just trying to get away with something. A small, aggressive dog in a carrier as a service animal?? Hmmm......
.
Samster said:
I agree with Swirt... It says right in those Q&As regarding service animals that the Federal regs supercede any local & State regulations. If you had someone with a service animal show up at your door, you would not be able to deny them lodging. And you might be surprised that someone with a service animal would not even think about letting you know beforehand that they have one, as they are not required to notify you.
I do wonder if in this instance with Bree's guest if this was a bonafide service animal or if they were just trying to get away with something. A small, aggressive dog in a carrier as a service animal?? Hmmm......
OK, it wasn't MY guest. It was seashanty's guest. I had the lady who thought the charge for the dog was too high.
In trish's case, I think maybe just seeing her dogs might make someone with a service animal change their mind. Why risk it?
.
oops, sorry...
You never know why someone books an accommodation :) Actually, a well trained service animal shouldn't even react to other dogs.
.
Samster said:
oops, sorry...
You never know why someone books an accommodation :) Actually, a well trained service animal shouldn't even react to other dogs.
I have no idea why these guests I just had booked 2 rooms. And we don't really know who slept in which rooms. There were supposed to be 4 of them and 1 canceled. They had to have the one room because of the dog, but they all could have stayed in the one room even with a 4th person.
.
Maybe the extra person(s) didn't like dogs or are allergic to dogs??
 

trishany

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 2, 2008
Messages
299
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0
Wow. So sorry you were caught off guard with this. So glad you posted this, though. It will help us tremendously. And, Swirt, thanks for posting the ADA Regulations.
What struck me was the question in the ADA Regs:
"I have alway had a clearly posted "no pets" policy at my establishment. Do I still have to allow service animals?
The answer in said Regs was:
Yes. A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your no pets policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disablilty. This does not mean you must abandon your "no pet policy" altogether.....
I think the key word here is "MODIFY". Draw your own conclusions. The Regs say that "A service animal is not a pet".
Now I have a question. If one does not allow dogs, and someone checks in with a service animal, am I not allowed to charge for the service animal?
I don't allow animals, so I don't charge other animals.
Am I to understand since I don't have official fees for animals at my inn (because I don't allow them) then I would not be allowed to charge for a service animal?
Riki
.
Don't know. The ADA Regs doesn't address fees, as far as I can see.
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
But, these Regs are so wide open to interpretation. If you look at the BIG picture, how many times will we have guests show up with a dog? It's not something to worry about.
But just know the rules.
We've never had a handicapped couple. But does "handicapped" mean "disabled?"
IF, IF, a couple does want to bring service dog, MOST will let us know beforehand. I think Bree was an exception.
.
trishany said:
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
I may be wrong, but I don't think you are off the hook. These are Federal Regs that supercede any County definitions. If you allow the public into your house in exchange for money, then you are a business. I would have a lawyer make that determination before denying anyone access on the grounds that you might not be a business. ;)
.
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,351
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223
Wow. So sorry you were caught off guard with this. So glad you posted this, though. It will help us tremendously. And, Swirt, thanks for posting the ADA Regulations.
What struck me was the question in the ADA Regs:
"I have alway had a clearly posted "no pets" policy at my establishment. Do I still have to allow service animals?
The answer in said Regs was:
Yes. A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your no pets policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disablilty. This does not mean you must abandon your "no pet policy" altogether.....
I think the key word here is "MODIFY". Draw your own conclusions. The Regs say that "A service animal is not a pet".
Now I have a question. If one does not allow dogs, and someone checks in with a service animal, am I not allowed to charge for the service animal?
I don't allow animals, so I don't charge other animals.
Am I to understand since I don't have official fees for animals at my inn (because I don't allow them) then I would not be allowed to charge for a service animal?
Riki
.
Don't know. The ADA Regs doesn't address fees, as far as I can see.
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
But, these Regs are so wide open to interpretation. If you look at the BIG picture, how many times will we have guests show up with a dog? It's not something to worry about.
But just know the rules.
We've never had a handicapped couple. But does "handicapped" mean "disabled?"
IF, IF, a couple does want to bring service dog, MOST will let us know beforehand. I think Bree was an exception.
.
trishany said:
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
I may be wrong, but I don't think you are off the hook. These are Federal Regs that supercede any County definitions. If you allow the public into your house in exchange for money, then you are a business. I would have a lawyer make that determination before denying anyone access on the grounds that you might not be a business. ;)
.
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
.
trishany said:
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
I think the rules are such that you cannot deny service for any reason other than the service animal is threatening or disruptive to the other guests. 'Disruptive' not including allergies.
You can certainly explain your territorial dogs or that another guest is present with a dog over which you have no control. Service dogs (REAL service dogs) are very well trained to not 'have' likes and dislikes. They do their job and ignore the rest. So they don't dislike children, but they will protect their person from harm. They don't dislike other dogs, but they will protect their person from harm.
If the service dog is unprovoked and aggressive toward other guests, it has to go. If it howls or damages the rooms, it has to go.
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,351
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Wow. So sorry you were caught off guard with this. So glad you posted this, though. It will help us tremendously. And, Swirt, thanks for posting the ADA Regulations.
What struck me was the question in the ADA Regs:
"I have alway had a clearly posted "no pets" policy at my establishment. Do I still have to allow service animals?
The answer in said Regs was:
Yes. A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your no pets policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disablilty. This does not mean you must abandon your "no pet policy" altogether.....
I think the key word here is "MODIFY". Draw your own conclusions. The Regs say that "A service animal is not a pet".
Now I have a question. If one does not allow dogs, and someone checks in with a service animal, am I not allowed to charge for the service animal?
I don't allow animals, so I don't charge other animals.
Am I to understand since I don't have official fees for animals at my inn (because I don't allow them) then I would not be allowed to charge for a service animal?
Riki
.
Don't know. The ADA Regs doesn't address fees, as far as I can see.
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
But, these Regs are so wide open to interpretation. If you look at the BIG picture, how many times will we have guests show up with a dog? It's not something to worry about.
But just know the rules.
We've never had a handicapped couple. But does "handicapped" mean "disabled?"
IF, IF, a couple does want to bring service dog, MOST will let us know beforehand. I think Bree was an exception.
.
I agree with Swirt... It says right in those Q&As regarding service animals that the Federal regs supercede any local & State regulations. If you had someone with a service animal show up at your door, you would not be able to deny them lodging. And you might be surprised that someone with a service animal would not even think about letting you know beforehand that they have one, as they are not required to notify you.
I do wonder if in this instance with Bree's guest if this was a bonafide service animal or if they were just trying to get away with something. A small, aggressive dog in a carrier as a service animal?? Hmmm......
.
Samster said:
I agree with Swirt... It says right in those Q&As regarding service animals that the Federal regs supercede any local & State regulations. If you had someone with a service animal show up at your door, you would not be able to deny them lodging. And you might be surprised that someone with a service animal would not even think about letting you know beforehand that they have one, as they are not required to notify you.
I do wonder if in this instance with Bree's guest if this was a bonafide service animal or if they were just trying to get away with something. A small, aggressive dog in a carrier as a service animal?? Hmmm......
OK, it wasn't MY guest. It was seashanty's guest. I had the lady who thought the charge for the dog was too high.
In trish's case, I think maybe just seeing her dogs might make someone with a service animal change their mind. Why risk it?
.
oops, sorry...
You never know why someone books an accommodation :) Actually, a well trained service animal shouldn't even react to other dogs.
.
Samster said:
oops, sorry...
You never know why someone books an accommodation :) Actually, a well trained service animal shouldn't even react to other dogs.
I have no idea why these guests I just had booked 2 rooms. And we don't really know who slept in which rooms. There were supposed to be 4 of them and 1 canceled. They had to have the one room because of the dog, but they all could have stayed in the one room even with a 4th person.
.
Maybe the extra person(s) didn't like dogs or are allergic to dogs??
.
Samster said:
Maybe the extra person(s) didn't like dogs or are allergic to dogs??
Tough vacation then all traveling in the same car!
 

trishany

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 2, 2008
Messages
299
Reaction score
0
Wow. So sorry you were caught off guard with this. So glad you posted this, though. It will help us tremendously. And, Swirt, thanks for posting the ADA Regulations.
What struck me was the question in the ADA Regs:
"I have alway had a clearly posted "no pets" policy at my establishment. Do I still have to allow service animals?
The answer in said Regs was:
Yes. A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your no pets policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disablilty. This does not mean you must abandon your "no pet policy" altogether.....
I think the key word here is "MODIFY". Draw your own conclusions. The Regs say that "A service animal is not a pet".
Now I have a question. If one does not allow dogs, and someone checks in with a service animal, am I not allowed to charge for the service animal?
I don't allow animals, so I don't charge other animals.
Am I to understand since I don't have official fees for animals at my inn (because I don't allow them) then I would not be allowed to charge for a service animal?
Riki
.
Don't know. The ADA Regs doesn't address fees, as far as I can see.
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
But, these Regs are so wide open to interpretation. If you look at the BIG picture, how many times will we have guests show up with a dog? It's not something to worry about.
But just know the rules.
We've never had a handicapped couple. But does "handicapped" mean "disabled?"
IF, IF, a couple does want to bring service dog, MOST will let us know beforehand. I think Bree was an exception.
.
trishany said:
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
I may be wrong, but I don't think you are off the hook. These are Federal Regs that supercede any County definitions. If you allow the public into your house in exchange for money, then you are a business. I would have a lawyer make that determination before denying anyone access on the grounds that you might not be a business. ;)
.
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
.
trishany said:
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
I think the rules are such that you cannot deny service for any reason other than the service animal is threatening or disruptive to the other guests. 'Disruptive' not including allergies.
You can certainly explain your territorial dogs or that another guest is present with a dog over which you have no control. Service dogs (REAL service dogs) are very well trained to not 'have' likes and dislikes. They do their job and ignore the rest. So they don't dislike children, but they will protect their person from harm. They don't dislike other dogs, but they will protect their person from harm.
If the service dog is unprovoked and aggressive toward other guests, it has to go. If it howls or damages the rooms, it has to go.
.
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
 

trishany

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 2, 2008
Messages
299
Reaction score
0
Wow. So sorry you were caught off guard with this. So glad you posted this, though. It will help us tremendously. And, Swirt, thanks for posting the ADA Regulations.
What struck me was the question in the ADA Regs:
"I have alway had a clearly posted "no pets" policy at my establishment. Do I still have to allow service animals?
The answer in said Regs was:
Yes. A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your no pets policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disablilty. This does not mean you must abandon your "no pet policy" altogether.....
I think the key word here is "MODIFY". Draw your own conclusions. The Regs say that "A service animal is not a pet".
Now I have a question. If one does not allow dogs, and someone checks in with a service animal, am I not allowed to charge for the service animal?
I don't allow animals, so I don't charge other animals.
Am I to understand since I don't have official fees for animals at my inn (because I don't allow them) then I would not be allowed to charge for a service animal?
Riki
.
Don't know. The ADA Regs doesn't address fees, as far as I can see.
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
But, these Regs are so wide open to interpretation. If you look at the BIG picture, how many times will we have guests show up with a dog? It's not something to worry about.
But just know the rules.
We've never had a handicapped couple. But does "handicapped" mean "disabled?"
IF, IF, a couple does want to bring service dog, MOST will let us know beforehand. I think Bree was an exception.
.
I agree with Swirt... It says right in those Q&As regarding service animals that the Federal regs supercede any local & State regulations. If you had someone with a service animal show up at your door, you would not be able to deny them lodging. And you might be surprised that someone with a service animal would not even think about letting you know beforehand that they have one, as they are not required to notify you.
I do wonder if in this instance with Bree's guest if this was a bonafide service animal or if they were just trying to get away with something. A small, aggressive dog in a carrier as a service animal?? Hmmm......
.
Samster said:
I agree with Swirt... It says right in those Q&As regarding service animals that the Federal regs supercede any local & State regulations. If you had someone with a service animal show up at your door, you would not be able to deny them lodging. And you might be surprised that someone with a service animal would not even think about letting you know beforehand that they have one, as they are not required to notify you.
I do wonder if in this instance with Bree's guest if this was a bonafide service animal or if they were just trying to get away with something. A small, aggressive dog in a carrier as a service animal?? Hmmm......
OK, it wasn't MY guest. It was seashanty's guest. I had the lady who thought the charge for the dog was too high.
In trish's case, I think maybe just seeing her dogs might make someone with a service animal change their mind. Why risk it?
.
oops, sorry...
You never know why someone books an accommodation :) Actually, a well trained service animal shouldn't even react to other dogs.
.
Samster, "shouldn't" doesn't hold up in a court of law. That's what we're talking about here, isn't it? --"what happens if you refuse a guest with a service dog?"
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,351
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223
Wow. So sorry you were caught off guard with this. So glad you posted this, though. It will help us tremendously. And, Swirt, thanks for posting the ADA Regulations.
What struck me was the question in the ADA Regs:
"I have alway had a clearly posted "no pets" policy at my establishment. Do I still have to allow service animals?
The answer in said Regs was:
Yes. A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your no pets policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disablilty. This does not mean you must abandon your "no pet policy" altogether.....
I think the key word here is "MODIFY". Draw your own conclusions. The Regs say that "A service animal is not a pet".
Now I have a question. If one does not allow dogs, and someone checks in with a service animal, am I not allowed to charge for the service animal?
I don't allow animals, so I don't charge other animals.
Am I to understand since I don't have official fees for animals at my inn (because I don't allow them) then I would not be allowed to charge for a service animal?
Riki
.
Don't know. The ADA Regs doesn't address fees, as far as I can see.
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
But, these Regs are so wide open to interpretation. If you look at the BIG picture, how many times will we have guests show up with a dog? It's not something to worry about.
But just know the rules.
We've never had a handicapped couple. But does "handicapped" mean "disabled?"
IF, IF, a couple does want to bring service dog, MOST will let us know beforehand. I think Bree was an exception.
.
trishany said:
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
I may be wrong, but I don't think you are off the hook. These are Federal Regs that supercede any County definitions. If you allow the public into your house in exchange for money, then you are a business. I would have a lawyer make that determination before denying anyone access on the grounds that you might not be a business. ;)
.
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
.
trishany said:
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
I think the rules are such that you cannot deny service for any reason other than the service animal is threatening or disruptive to the other guests. 'Disruptive' not including allergies.
You can certainly explain your territorial dogs or that another guest is present with a dog over which you have no control. Service dogs (REAL service dogs) are very well trained to not 'have' likes and dislikes. They do their job and ignore the rest. So they don't dislike children, but they will protect their person from harm. They don't dislike other dogs, but they will protect their person from harm.
If the service dog is unprovoked and aggressive toward other guests, it has to go. If it howls or damages the rooms, it has to go.
.
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
.
trishany said:
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
You may refuse the dog if it acts aggrssively before the guest takes the room (barking at you, lunging at you or family or other guests, snarling at you & yours, that sort of thing). You may ask the guest to leave if it happens after the room is booked.
The svc dog will not have any interest in you or your kids when it is 'on duty' which means when it is wearing it's halter unless YOU threaten the animal's owner. When the halter is removed, the well-trained dog is 'off duty' and will play just like any other dog.
The service dog is disruptive if IT (not any surrounding dogs/cats/children/wombats) acts aggressively or howls/barks when it is not attending to its person. Some svc dogs will bark to alert their person, but not bark excessively unless their person does not respond.
So, pretty much the only 'disruptive' behavior in your list is the one where the svc dog barks all night. Everything else doesn't count.
Peeing on your carpet is not aggression (it's actually a passive behavior in dogs). Svc animals are trained to do their business on command. Usually 'Get busy' is the command. They go where and when they are told (IF they are properly trained).
If YOUR dogs misbehave, that is YOUR problem! If your kids are a problem (and I know you don't have any so comment not directed at you) then you need to control your child.
Allergies do not count. Not yours, not your kid's, not the other guest's.
 

trishany

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Wow. So sorry you were caught off guard with this. So glad you posted this, though. It will help us tremendously. And, Swirt, thanks for posting the ADA Regulations.
What struck me was the question in the ADA Regs:
"I have alway had a clearly posted "no pets" policy at my establishment. Do I still have to allow service animals?
The answer in said Regs was:
Yes. A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your no pets policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disablilty. This does not mean you must abandon your "no pet policy" altogether.....
I think the key word here is "MODIFY". Draw your own conclusions. The Regs say that "A service animal is not a pet".
Now I have a question. If one does not allow dogs, and someone checks in with a service animal, am I not allowed to charge for the service animal?
I don't allow animals, so I don't charge other animals.
Am I to understand since I don't have official fees for animals at my inn (because I don't allow them) then I would not be allowed to charge for a service animal?
Riki
.
Don't know. The ADA Regs doesn't address fees, as far as I can see.
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
But, these Regs are so wide open to interpretation. If you look at the BIG picture, how many times will we have guests show up with a dog? It's not something to worry about.
But just know the rules.
We've never had a handicapped couple. But does "handicapped" mean "disabled?"
IF, IF, a couple does want to bring service dog, MOST will let us know beforehand. I think Bree was an exception.
.
trishany said:
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
I may be wrong, but I don't think you are off the hook. These are Federal Regs that supercede any County definitions. If you allow the public into your house in exchange for money, then you are a business. I would have a lawyer make that determination before denying anyone access on the grounds that you might not be a business. ;)
.
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
.
trishany said:
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
I think the rules are such that you cannot deny service for any reason other than the service animal is threatening or disruptive to the other guests. 'Disruptive' not including allergies.
You can certainly explain your territorial dogs or that another guest is present with a dog over which you have no control. Service dogs (REAL service dogs) are very well trained to not 'have' likes and dislikes. They do their job and ignore the rest. So they don't dislike children, but they will protect their person from harm. They don't dislike other dogs, but they will protect their person from harm.
If the service dog is unprovoked and aggressive toward other guests, it has to go. If it howls or damages the rooms, it has to go.
.
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
.
trishany said:
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
You may refuse the dog if it acts aggrssively before the guest takes the room (barking at you, lunging at you or family or other guests, snarling at you & yours, that sort of thing). You may ask the guest to leave if it happens after the room is booked.
The svc dog will not have any interest in you or your kids when it is 'on duty' which means when it is wearing it's halter unless YOU threaten the animal's owner. When the halter is removed, the well-trained dog is 'off duty' and will play just like any other dog.
The service dog is disruptive if IT (not any surrounding dogs/cats/children/wombats) acts aggressively or howls/barks when it is not attending to its person. Some svc dogs will bark to alert their person, but not bark excessively unless their person does not respond.
So, pretty much the only 'disruptive' behavior in your list is the one where the svc dog barks all night. Everything else doesn't count.
Peeing on your carpet is not aggression (it's actually a passive behavior in dogs). Svc animals are trained to do their business on command. Usually 'Get busy' is the command. They go where and when they are told (IF they are properly trained).
If YOUR dogs misbehave, that is YOUR problem! If your kids are a problem (and I know you don't have any so comment not directed at you) then you need to control your child.
Allergies do not count. Not yours, not your kid's, not the other guest's.
.
I think we moved off the subject.
Innkeepers want to know a reason for not allowing service pets.
Your reply is loaded with alot of "if's". A judge does not want to hear: "IF, the 2-year old didn't run, the svc dog would not have bit him/her", or IF the svc dog knew that OUR dogs were just playing, they wouldn't have injured him/her.
I love dogs, had dogs all my life, was trained with dogs. I know dogs. I know service dogs. My two behmouths sleep with us! I can't even watch "Animal Cops" on tv!. lol
But, I don't want them in my beautiful guest rooms. Our guests are paying alot of money to sleep in these rooms, and I don't think it's fair to have them sleep in a room where a dog has been (may they be allergic or whatever).
So, if someone shows up with a "companion" animal, I will graciously tell them that their dog will disrupt the B&B and take it from there.
 

muirford

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Wow. So sorry you were caught off guard with this. So glad you posted this, though. It will help us tremendously. And, Swirt, thanks for posting the ADA Regulations.
What struck me was the question in the ADA Regs:
"I have alway had a clearly posted "no pets" policy at my establishment. Do I still have to allow service animals?
The answer in said Regs was:
Yes. A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your no pets policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disablilty. This does not mean you must abandon your "no pet policy" altogether.....
I think the key word here is "MODIFY". Draw your own conclusions. The Regs say that "A service animal is not a pet".
Now I have a question. If one does not allow dogs, and someone checks in with a service animal, am I not allowed to charge for the service animal?
I don't allow animals, so I don't charge other animals.
Am I to understand since I don't have official fees for animals at my inn (because I don't allow them) then I would not be allowed to charge for a service animal?
Riki
.
Don't know. The ADA Regs doesn't address fees, as far as I can see.
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
But, these Regs are so wide open to interpretation. If you look at the BIG picture, how many times will we have guests show up with a dog? It's not something to worry about.
But just know the rules.
We've never had a handicapped couple. But does "handicapped" mean "disabled?"
IF, IF, a couple does want to bring service dog, MOST will let us know beforehand. I think Bree was an exception.
.
trishany said:
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
I may be wrong, but I don't think you are off the hook. These are Federal Regs that supercede any County definitions. If you allow the public into your house in exchange for money, then you are a business. I would have a lawyer make that determination before denying anyone access on the grounds that you might not be a business. ;)
.
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
.
trishany said:
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
I think the rules are such that you cannot deny service for any reason other than the service animal is threatening or disruptive to the other guests. 'Disruptive' not including allergies.
You can certainly explain your territorial dogs or that another guest is present with a dog over which you have no control. Service dogs (REAL service dogs) are very well trained to not 'have' likes and dislikes. They do their job and ignore the rest. So they don't dislike children, but they will protect their person from harm. They don't dislike other dogs, but they will protect their person from harm.
If the service dog is unprovoked and aggressive toward other guests, it has to go. If it howls or damages the rooms, it has to go.
.
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
.
trishany said:
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
You may refuse the dog if it acts aggrssively before the guest takes the room (barking at you, lunging at you or family or other guests, snarling at you & yours, that sort of thing). You may ask the guest to leave if it happens after the room is booked.
The svc dog will not have any interest in you or your kids when it is 'on duty' which means when it is wearing it's halter unless YOU threaten the animal's owner. When the halter is removed, the well-trained dog is 'off duty' and will play just like any other dog.
The service dog is disruptive if IT (not any surrounding dogs/cats/children/wombats) acts aggressively or howls/barks when it is not attending to its person. Some svc dogs will bark to alert their person, but not bark excessively unless their person does not respond.
So, pretty much the only 'disruptive' behavior in your list is the one where the svc dog barks all night. Everything else doesn't count.
Peeing on your carpet is not aggression (it's actually a passive behavior in dogs). Svc animals are trained to do their business on command. Usually 'Get busy' is the command. They go where and when they are told (IF they are properly trained).
If YOUR dogs misbehave, that is YOUR problem! If your kids are a problem (and I know you don't have any so comment not directed at you) then you need to control your child.
Allergies do not count. Not yours, not your kid's, not the other guest's.
.
I think we moved off the subject.
Innkeepers want to know a reason for not allowing service pets.
Your reply is loaded with alot of "if's". A judge does not want to hear: "IF, the 2-year old didn't run, the svc dog would not have bit him/her", or IF the svc dog knew that OUR dogs were just playing, they wouldn't have injured him/her.
I love dogs, had dogs all my life, was trained with dogs. I know dogs. I know service dogs. My two behmouths sleep with us! I can't even watch "Animal Cops" on tv!. lol
But, I don't want them in my beautiful guest rooms. Our guests are paying alot of money to sleep in these rooms, and I don't think it's fair to have them sleep in a room where a dog has been (may they be allergic or whatever).
So, if someone shows up with a "companion" animal, I will graciously tell them that their dog will disrupt the B&B and take it from there.
.
What the ADA regs say is that it is discrimination for YOU to say that a blind/disabled/deaf person with a service animal cannot stay with you because it will put out other guests. Or because it will disrupt your dogs or your B&B. If you don't see that in those ADA regs...well, there are none so blind as those who will not see. Take whatever risks you want, but don't interpret anything anyone else has said as making that recommendation.
What most of us say is refuse a service dog at your own risk, and prepare to be sued. There have been cases of people testing the waters with exactly these kind of situations and then taking the B&Bs to court when they have been refused service - some Florida lawyers made a lot of money doing it.
 

Morticia

Administrator
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Messages
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Wow. So sorry you were caught off guard with this. So glad you posted this, though. It will help us tremendously. And, Swirt, thanks for posting the ADA Regulations.
What struck me was the question in the ADA Regs:
"I have alway had a clearly posted "no pets" policy at my establishment. Do I still have to allow service animals?
The answer in said Regs was:
Yes. A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your no pets policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disablilty. This does not mean you must abandon your "no pet policy" altogether.....
I think the key word here is "MODIFY". Draw your own conclusions. The Regs say that "A service animal is not a pet".
Now I have a question. If one does not allow dogs, and someone checks in with a service animal, am I not allowed to charge for the service animal?
I don't allow animals, so I don't charge other animals.
Am I to understand since I don't have official fees for animals at my inn (because I don't allow them) then I would not be allowed to charge for a service animal?
Riki
.
Don't know. The ADA Regs doesn't address fees, as far as I can see.
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
But, these Regs are so wide open to interpretation. If you look at the BIG picture, how many times will we have guests show up with a dog? It's not something to worry about.
But just know the rules.
We've never had a handicapped couple. But does "handicapped" mean "disabled?"
IF, IF, a couple does want to bring service dog, MOST will let us know beforehand. I think Bree was an exception.
.
trishany said:
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
I may be wrong, but I don't think you are off the hook. These are Federal Regs that supercede any County definitions. If you allow the public into your house in exchange for money, then you are a business. I would have a lawyer make that determination before denying anyone access on the grounds that you might not be a business. ;)
.
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
.
trishany said:
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
I think the rules are such that you cannot deny service for any reason other than the service animal is threatening or disruptive to the other guests. 'Disruptive' not including allergies.
You can certainly explain your territorial dogs or that another guest is present with a dog over which you have no control. Service dogs (REAL service dogs) are very well trained to not 'have' likes and dislikes. They do their job and ignore the rest. So they don't dislike children, but they will protect their person from harm. They don't dislike other dogs, but they will protect their person from harm.
If the service dog is unprovoked and aggressive toward other guests, it has to go. If it howls or damages the rooms, it has to go.
.
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
.
trishany said:
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
You may refuse the dog if it acts aggrssively before the guest takes the room (barking at you, lunging at you or family or other guests, snarling at you & yours, that sort of thing). You may ask the guest to leave if it happens after the room is booked.
The svc dog will not have any interest in you or your kids when it is 'on duty' which means when it is wearing it's halter unless YOU threaten the animal's owner. When the halter is removed, the well-trained dog is 'off duty' and will play just like any other dog.
The service dog is disruptive if IT (not any surrounding dogs/cats/children/wombats) acts aggressively or howls/barks when it is not attending to its person. Some svc dogs will bark to alert their person, but not bark excessively unless their person does not respond.
So, pretty much the only 'disruptive' behavior in your list is the one where the svc dog barks all night. Everything else doesn't count.
Peeing on your carpet is not aggression (it's actually a passive behavior in dogs). Svc animals are trained to do their business on command. Usually 'Get busy' is the command. They go where and when they are told (IF they are properly trained).
If YOUR dogs misbehave, that is YOUR problem! If your kids are a problem (and I know you don't have any so comment not directed at you) then you need to control your child.
Allergies do not count. Not yours, not your kid's, not the other guest's.
.
I think we moved off the subject.
Innkeepers want to know a reason for not allowing service pets.
Your reply is loaded with alot of "if's". A judge does not want to hear: "IF, the 2-year old didn't run, the svc dog would not have bit him/her", or IF the svc dog knew that OUR dogs were just playing, they wouldn't have injured him/her.
I love dogs, had dogs all my life, was trained with dogs. I know dogs. I know service dogs. My two behmouths sleep with us! I can't even watch "Animal Cops" on tv!. lol
But, I don't want them in my beautiful guest rooms. Our guests are paying alot of money to sleep in these rooms, and I don't think it's fair to have them sleep in a room where a dog has been (may they be allergic or whatever).
So, if someone shows up with a "companion" animal, I will graciously tell them that their dog will disrupt the B&B and take it from there.
.
trishany said:
So, if someone shows up with a "companion" animal, I will graciously tell them that their dog will disrupt the B&B and take it from there.
And there you have hit the nail right on the head...you have to do what you think is right and correct. For me, I take the guest and the animal and just wash the bedding the next day. Easy peasy.
 

trishany

Well-known member
Joined
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Messages
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Wow. So sorry you were caught off guard with this. So glad you posted this, though. It will help us tremendously. And, Swirt, thanks for posting the ADA Regulations.
What struck me was the question in the ADA Regs:
"I have alway had a clearly posted "no pets" policy at my establishment. Do I still have to allow service animals?
The answer in said Regs was:
Yes. A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your no pets policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disablilty. This does not mean you must abandon your "no pet policy" altogether.....
I think the key word here is "MODIFY". Draw your own conclusions. The Regs say that "A service animal is not a pet".
Now I have a question. If one does not allow dogs, and someone checks in with a service animal, am I not allowed to charge for the service animal?
I don't allow animals, so I don't charge other animals.
Am I to understand since I don't have official fees for animals at my inn (because I don't allow them) then I would not be allowed to charge for a service animal?
Riki
.
Don't know. The ADA Regs doesn't address fees, as far as I can see.
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
But, these Regs are so wide open to interpretation. If you look at the BIG picture, how many times will we have guests show up with a dog? It's not something to worry about.
But just know the rules.
We've never had a handicapped couple. But does "handicapped" mean "disabled?"
IF, IF, a couple does want to bring service dog, MOST will let us know beforehand. I think Bree was an exception.
.
trishany said:
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
I may be wrong, but I don't think you are off the hook. These are Federal Regs that supercede any County definitions. If you allow the public into your house in exchange for money, then you are a business. I would have a lawyer make that determination before denying anyone access on the grounds that you might not be a business. ;)
.
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
.
trishany said:
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
I think the rules are such that you cannot deny service for any reason other than the service animal is threatening or disruptive to the other guests. 'Disruptive' not including allergies.
You can certainly explain your territorial dogs or that another guest is present with a dog over which you have no control. Service dogs (REAL service dogs) are very well trained to not 'have' likes and dislikes. They do their job and ignore the rest. So they don't dislike children, but they will protect their person from harm. They don't dislike other dogs, but they will protect their person from harm.
If the service dog is unprovoked and aggressive toward other guests, it has to go. If it howls or damages the rooms, it has to go.
.
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
.
trishany said:
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
You may refuse the dog if it acts aggrssively before the guest takes the room (barking at you, lunging at you or family or other guests, snarling at you & yours, that sort of thing). You may ask the guest to leave if it happens after the room is booked.
The svc dog will not have any interest in you or your kids when it is 'on duty' which means when it is wearing it's halter unless YOU threaten the animal's owner. When the halter is removed, the well-trained dog is 'off duty' and will play just like any other dog.
The service dog is disruptive if IT (not any surrounding dogs/cats/children/wombats) acts aggressively or howls/barks when it is not attending to its person. Some svc dogs will bark to alert their person, but not bark excessively unless their person does not respond.
So, pretty much the only 'disruptive' behavior in your list is the one where the svc dog barks all night. Everything else doesn't count.
Peeing on your carpet is not aggression (it's actually a passive behavior in dogs). Svc animals are trained to do their business on command. Usually 'Get busy' is the command. They go where and when they are told (IF they are properly trained).
If YOUR dogs misbehave, that is YOUR problem! If your kids are a problem (and I know you don't have any so comment not directed at you) then you need to control your child.
Allergies do not count. Not yours, not your kid's, not the other guest's.
.
I think we moved off the subject.
Innkeepers want to know a reason for not allowing service pets.
Your reply is loaded with alot of "if's". A judge does not want to hear: "IF, the 2-year old didn't run, the svc dog would not have bit him/her", or IF the svc dog knew that OUR dogs were just playing, they wouldn't have injured him/her.
I love dogs, had dogs all my life, was trained with dogs. I know dogs. I know service dogs. My two behmouths sleep with us! I can't even watch "Animal Cops" on tv!. lol
But, I don't want them in my beautiful guest rooms. Our guests are paying alot of money to sleep in these rooms, and I don't think it's fair to have them sleep in a room where a dog has been (may they be allergic or whatever).
So, if someone shows up with a "companion" animal, I will graciously tell them that their dog will disrupt the B&B and take it from there.
.
trishany said:
So, if someone shows up with a "companion" animal, I will graciously tell them that their dog will disrupt the B&B and take it from there.
And there you have hit the nail right on the head...you have to do what you think is right and correct. For me, I take the guest and the animal and just wash the bedding the next day. Easy peasy.
.
I think if there was a dog in the room, I would wash more than the bedding. I'm happy it's so easy for you. Dogs do shed, you know and not just on the bedding. And when you have guests coming into that same room in a few hours, and have 4 other rooms to change in THAT same time frame, I would rather not have to clean the dog fur.
 

swirt

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Wow. So sorry you were caught off guard with this. So glad you posted this, though. It will help us tremendously. And, Swirt, thanks for posting the ADA Regulations.
What struck me was the question in the ADA Regs:
"I have alway had a clearly posted "no pets" policy at my establishment. Do I still have to allow service animals?
The answer in said Regs was:
Yes. A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your no pets policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disablilty. This does not mean you must abandon your "no pet policy" altogether.....
I think the key word here is "MODIFY". Draw your own conclusions. The Regs say that "A service animal is not a pet".
Now I have a question. If one does not allow dogs, and someone checks in with a service animal, am I not allowed to charge for the service animal?
I don't allow animals, so I don't charge other animals.
Am I to understand since I don't have official fees for animals at my inn (because I don't allow them) then I would not be allowed to charge for a service animal?
Riki
.
Don't know. The ADA Regs doesn't address fees, as far as I can see.
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
But, these Regs are so wide open to interpretation. If you look at the BIG picture, how many times will we have guests show up with a dog? It's not something to worry about.
But just know the rules.
We've never had a handicapped couple. But does "handicapped" mean "disabled?"
IF, IF, a couple does want to bring service dog, MOST will let us know beforehand. I think Bree was an exception.
.
trishany said:
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
I may be wrong, but I don't think you are off the hook. These are Federal Regs that supercede any County definitions. If you allow the public into your house in exchange for money, then you are a business. I would have a lawyer make that determination before denying anyone access on the grounds that you might not be a business. ;)
.
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
.
trishany said:
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
I think the rules are such that you cannot deny service for any reason other than the service animal is threatening or disruptive to the other guests. 'Disruptive' not including allergies.
You can certainly explain your territorial dogs or that another guest is present with a dog over which you have no control. Service dogs (REAL service dogs) are very well trained to not 'have' likes and dislikes. They do their job and ignore the rest. So they don't dislike children, but they will protect their person from harm. They don't dislike other dogs, but they will protect their person from harm.
If the service dog is unprovoked and aggressive toward other guests, it has to go. If it howls or damages the rooms, it has to go.
.
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
.
trishany said:
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
You may refuse the dog if it acts aggrssively before the guest takes the room (barking at you, lunging at you or family or other guests, snarling at you & yours, that sort of thing). You may ask the guest to leave if it happens after the room is booked.
The svc dog will not have any interest in you or your kids when it is 'on duty' which means when it is wearing it's halter unless YOU threaten the animal's owner. When the halter is removed, the well-trained dog is 'off duty' and will play just like any other dog.
The service dog is disruptive if IT (not any surrounding dogs/cats/children/wombats) acts aggressively or howls/barks when it is not attending to its person. Some svc dogs will bark to alert their person, but not bark excessively unless their person does not respond.
So, pretty much the only 'disruptive' behavior in your list is the one where the svc dog barks all night. Everything else doesn't count.
Peeing on your carpet is not aggression (it's actually a passive behavior in dogs). Svc animals are trained to do their business on command. Usually 'Get busy' is the command. They go where and when they are told (IF they are properly trained).
If YOUR dogs misbehave, that is YOUR problem! If your kids are a problem (and I know you don't have any so comment not directed at you) then you need to control your child.
Allergies do not count. Not yours, not your kid's, not the other guest's.
.
I think we moved off the subject.
Innkeepers want to know a reason for not allowing service pets.
Your reply is loaded with alot of "if's". A judge does not want to hear: "IF, the 2-year old didn't run, the svc dog would not have bit him/her", or IF the svc dog knew that OUR dogs were just playing, they wouldn't have injured him/her.
I love dogs, had dogs all my life, was trained with dogs. I know dogs. I know service dogs. My two behmouths sleep with us! I can't even watch "Animal Cops" on tv!. lol
But, I don't want them in my beautiful guest rooms. Our guests are paying alot of money to sleep in these rooms, and I don't think it's fair to have them sleep in a room where a dog has been (may they be allergic or whatever).
So, if someone shows up with a "companion" animal, I will graciously tell them that their dog will disrupt the B&B and take it from there.
.
trishany said:
So, if someone shows up with a "companion" animal, I will graciously tell them that their dog will disrupt the B&B and take it from there.
And there you have hit the nail right on the head...you have to do what you think is right and correct. For me, I take the guest and the animal and just wash the bedding the next day. Easy peasy.
.
I think if there was a dog in the room, I would wash more than the bedding. I'm happy it's so easy for you. Dogs do shed, you know and not just on the bedding. And when you have guests coming into that same room in a few hours, and have 4 other rooms to change in THAT same time frame, I would rather not have to clean the dog fur.
.
Welcome to running a business. This is the obligation you accept when you hang the proverbial shingle. You certainly can not deny access (legally) to a disabled person and their service animal because you are afraid of what might happen or would "rather not clean the dog fur" or "rather not have the service animal on the bed that others pay top dollar for." You may not want them on the bed, but if the person is allowed on the bed, the service animal must be allowed on it too. As mentioned before, the spirit of the law is that the animal is an extention of the person.
 

YellowSocks

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Joined
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Messages
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Wow. So sorry you were caught off guard with this. So glad you posted this, though. It will help us tremendously. And, Swirt, thanks for posting the ADA Regulations.
What struck me was the question in the ADA Regs:
"I have alway had a clearly posted "no pets" policy at my establishment. Do I still have to allow service animals?
The answer in said Regs was:
Yes. A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your no pets policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disablilty. This does not mean you must abandon your "no pet policy" altogether.....
I think the key word here is "MODIFY". Draw your own conclusions. The Regs say that "A service animal is not a pet".
Now I have a question. If one does not allow dogs, and someone checks in with a service animal, am I not allowed to charge for the service animal?
I don't allow animals, so I don't charge other animals.
Am I to understand since I don't have official fees for animals at my inn (because I don't allow them) then I would not be allowed to charge for a service animal?
Riki
.
Don't know. The ADA Regs doesn't address fees, as far as I can see.
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
But, these Regs are so wide open to interpretation. If you look at the BIG picture, how many times will we have guests show up with a dog? It's not something to worry about.
But just know the rules.
We've never had a handicapped couple. But does "handicapped" mean "disabled?"
IF, IF, a couple does want to bring service dog, MOST will let us know beforehand. I think Bree was an exception.
.
trishany said:
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
I may be wrong, but I don't think you are off the hook. These are Federal Regs that supercede any County definitions. If you allow the public into your house in exchange for money, then you are a business. I would have a lawyer make that determination before denying anyone access on the grounds that you might not be a business. ;)
.
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
.
trishany said:
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
I think the rules are such that you cannot deny service for any reason other than the service animal is threatening or disruptive to the other guests. 'Disruptive' not including allergies.
You can certainly explain your territorial dogs or that another guest is present with a dog over which you have no control. Service dogs (REAL service dogs) are very well trained to not 'have' likes and dislikes. They do their job and ignore the rest. So they don't dislike children, but they will protect their person from harm. They don't dislike other dogs, but they will protect their person from harm.
If the service dog is unprovoked and aggressive toward other guests, it has to go. If it howls or damages the rooms, it has to go.
.
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
.
trishany said:
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
You may refuse the dog if it acts aggrssively before the guest takes the room (barking at you, lunging at you or family or other guests, snarling at you & yours, that sort of thing). You may ask the guest to leave if it happens after the room is booked.
The svc dog will not have any interest in you or your kids when it is 'on duty' which means when it is wearing it's halter unless YOU threaten the animal's owner. When the halter is removed, the well-trained dog is 'off duty' and will play just like any other dog.
The service dog is disruptive if IT (not any surrounding dogs/cats/children/wombats) acts aggressively or howls/barks when it is not attending to its person. Some svc dogs will bark to alert their person, but not bark excessively unless their person does not respond.
So, pretty much the only 'disruptive' behavior in your list is the one where the svc dog barks all night. Everything else doesn't count.
Peeing on your carpet is not aggression (it's actually a passive behavior in dogs). Svc animals are trained to do their business on command. Usually 'Get busy' is the command. They go where and when they are told (IF they are properly trained).
If YOUR dogs misbehave, that is YOUR problem! If your kids are a problem (and I know you don't have any so comment not directed at you) then you need to control your child.
Allergies do not count. Not yours, not your kid's, not the other guest's.
.
I think we moved off the subject.
Innkeepers want to know a reason for not allowing service pets.
Your reply is loaded with alot of "if's". A judge does not want to hear: "IF, the 2-year old didn't run, the svc dog would not have bit him/her", or IF the svc dog knew that OUR dogs were just playing, they wouldn't have injured him/her.
I love dogs, had dogs all my life, was trained with dogs. I know dogs. I know service dogs. My two behmouths sleep with us! I can't even watch "Animal Cops" on tv!. lol
But, I don't want them in my beautiful guest rooms. Our guests are paying alot of money to sleep in these rooms, and I don't think it's fair to have them sleep in a room where a dog has been (may they be allergic or whatever).
So, if someone shows up with a "companion" animal, I will graciously tell them that their dog will disrupt the B&B and take it from there.
.
trishany said:
So, if someone shows up with a "companion" animal, I will graciously tell them that their dog will disrupt the B&B and take it from there.
And there you have hit the nail right on the head...you have to do what you think is right and correct. For me, I take the guest and the animal and just wash the bedding the next day. Easy peasy.
.
I think if there was a dog in the room, I would wash more than the bedding. I'm happy it's so easy for you. Dogs do shed, you know and not just on the bedding. And when you have guests coming into that same room in a few hours, and have 4 other rooms to change in THAT same time frame, I would rather not have to clean the dog fur.
.
We are pet free. I like pets well enough, but I have enough mess and expense with the ds4x2 (plus dh for that matter) not to want to add more. When pressed by friends and relatives why they can't bring their pet, I have allergies. (It's true, I do, but they're certainly not deadly.)
I don't want dander, hair, or any other dog mess. I am willing to deal with kid mess... it's a known entity for me and one I have to deal with anyway. If a disabled person showed up with a service animal, I would be less than enthused about the dander, but mollified by the fact that a well-trained trained service animal will be less messy than a standard pet.
I can imagine if I were blind or otherwise disabled (which is not difficult to imagine since dh has needed hearing aids in both ears his whole life but rarely actually wears them [separate topic!] so we deal with a disability every day) and liked or needed to travel, how frustrating it would be to be turned away from a place I had planned to stay, and probably looked forward to staying at. I would hate to disappoint someone like that!
Some guests are easy to clean after, some take longer. If I have to flip all four rooms in one day I'm tired either way. If one of those rooms had a service animal, then it gets the special treatment and I cut corners as needed on the others.
My only hope is that I'm exempt because of my size, but I haven't read that anywhere. As far as I understand if you take the traveling public then you must take the disabled traveling public's service animals as an extension of themselves.
The issue for me (as mentioned in the other thread) is not so much taking a well-trained service animal, but being taken in by imposters claiming their pet is a service animal. But it's no different than people who give a sob story and cancel, or take extra bottles of water, or otherwise abuse our generosity. Two responses: 1) what goes around, comes around, and 2) does it kill me to be wronged now and then? Oh well!
=)
Kk.
 

Morticia

Administrator
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Messages
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Wow. So sorry you were caught off guard with this. So glad you posted this, though. It will help us tremendously. And, Swirt, thanks for posting the ADA Regulations.
What struck me was the question in the ADA Regs:
"I have alway had a clearly posted "no pets" policy at my establishment. Do I still have to allow service animals?
The answer in said Regs was:
Yes. A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your no pets policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disablilty. This does not mean you must abandon your "no pet policy" altogether.....
I think the key word here is "MODIFY". Draw your own conclusions. The Regs say that "A service animal is not a pet".
Now I have a question. If one does not allow dogs, and someone checks in with a service animal, am I not allowed to charge for the service animal?
I don't allow animals, so I don't charge other animals.
Am I to understand since I don't have official fees for animals at my inn (because I don't allow them) then I would not be allowed to charge for a service animal?
Riki
.
Don't know. The ADA Regs doesn't address fees, as far as I can see.
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
But, these Regs are so wide open to interpretation. If you look at the BIG picture, how many times will we have guests show up with a dog? It's not something to worry about.
But just know the rules.
We've never had a handicapped couple. But does "handicapped" mean "disabled?"
IF, IF, a couple does want to bring service dog, MOST will let us know beforehand. I think Bree was an exception.
.
trishany said:
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
I may be wrong, but I don't think you are off the hook. These are Federal Regs that supercede any County definitions. If you allow the public into your house in exchange for money, then you are a business. I would have a lawyer make that determination before denying anyone access on the grounds that you might not be a business. ;)
.
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
.
trishany said:
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
I think the rules are such that you cannot deny service for any reason other than the service animal is threatening or disruptive to the other guests. 'Disruptive' not including allergies.
You can certainly explain your territorial dogs or that another guest is present with a dog over which you have no control. Service dogs (REAL service dogs) are very well trained to not 'have' likes and dislikes. They do their job and ignore the rest. So they don't dislike children, but they will protect their person from harm. They don't dislike other dogs, but they will protect their person from harm.
If the service dog is unprovoked and aggressive toward other guests, it has to go. If it howls or damages the rooms, it has to go.
.
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
.
trishany said:
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
You may refuse the dog if it acts aggrssively before the guest takes the room (barking at you, lunging at you or family or other guests, snarling at you & yours, that sort of thing). You may ask the guest to leave if it happens after the room is booked.
The svc dog will not have any interest in you or your kids when it is 'on duty' which means when it is wearing it's halter unless YOU threaten the animal's owner. When the halter is removed, the well-trained dog is 'off duty' and will play just like any other dog.
The service dog is disruptive if IT (not any surrounding dogs/cats/children/wombats) acts aggressively or howls/barks when it is not attending to its person. Some svc dogs will bark to alert their person, but not bark excessively unless their person does not respond.
So, pretty much the only 'disruptive' behavior in your list is the one where the svc dog barks all night. Everything else doesn't count.
Peeing on your carpet is not aggression (it's actually a passive behavior in dogs). Svc animals are trained to do their business on command. Usually 'Get busy' is the command. They go where and when they are told (IF they are properly trained).
If YOUR dogs misbehave, that is YOUR problem! If your kids are a problem (and I know you don't have any so comment not directed at you) then you need to control your child.
Allergies do not count. Not yours, not your kid's, not the other guest's.
.
I think we moved off the subject.
Innkeepers want to know a reason for not allowing service pets.
Your reply is loaded with alot of "if's". A judge does not want to hear: "IF, the 2-year old didn't run, the svc dog would not have bit him/her", or IF the svc dog knew that OUR dogs were just playing, they wouldn't have injured him/her.
I love dogs, had dogs all my life, was trained with dogs. I know dogs. I know service dogs. My two behmouths sleep with us! I can't even watch "Animal Cops" on tv!. lol
But, I don't want them in my beautiful guest rooms. Our guests are paying alot of money to sleep in these rooms, and I don't think it's fair to have them sleep in a room where a dog has been (may they be allergic or whatever).
So, if someone shows up with a "companion" animal, I will graciously tell them that their dog will disrupt the B&B and take it from there.
.
trishany said:
So, if someone shows up with a "companion" animal, I will graciously tell them that their dog will disrupt the B&B and take it from there.
And there you have hit the nail right on the head...you have to do what you think is right and correct. For me, I take the guest and the animal and just wash the bedding the next day. Easy peasy.
.
I think if there was a dog in the room, I would wash more than the bedding. I'm happy it's so easy for you. Dogs do shed, you know and not just on the bedding. And when you have guests coming into that same room in a few hours, and have 4 other rooms to change in THAT same time frame, I would rather not have to clean the dog fur.
.
trishany said:
I think if there was a dog in the room, I would wash more than the bedding. I'm happy it's so easy for you. Dogs do shed, you know and not just on the bedding. And when you have guests coming into that same room in a few hours, and have 4 other rooms to change in THAT same time frame, I would rather not have to clean the dog fur.
I have 7 rooms I swap out while washing bedding that dogs have slept on. Have an allegic guest in my dog room right now, perfectly sneeze free and not a complaint. It can be done if you WANT to do it. If you don't want to, then don't.
 

Samster

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Wow. So sorry you were caught off guard with this. So glad you posted this, though. It will help us tremendously. And, Swirt, thanks for posting the ADA Regulations.
What struck me was the question in the ADA Regs:
"I have alway had a clearly posted "no pets" policy at my establishment. Do I still have to allow service animals?
The answer in said Regs was:
Yes. A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your no pets policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disablilty. This does not mean you must abandon your "no pet policy" altogether.....
I think the key word here is "MODIFY". Draw your own conclusions. The Regs say that "A service animal is not a pet".
Now I have a question. If one does not allow dogs, and someone checks in with a service animal, am I not allowed to charge for the service animal?
I don't allow animals, so I don't charge other animals.
Am I to understand since I don't have official fees for animals at my inn (because I don't allow them) then I would not be allowed to charge for a service animal?
Riki
.
Don't know. The ADA Regs doesn't address fees, as far as I can see.
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
But, these Regs are so wide open to interpretation. If you look at the BIG picture, how many times will we have guests show up with a dog? It's not something to worry about.
But just know the rules.
We've never had a handicapped couple. But does "handicapped" mean "disabled?"
IF, IF, a couple does want to bring service dog, MOST will let us know beforehand. I think Bree was an exception.
.
I agree with Swirt... It says right in those Q&As regarding service animals that the Federal regs supercede any local & State regulations. If you had someone with a service animal show up at your door, you would not be able to deny them lodging. And you might be surprised that someone with a service animal would not even think about letting you know beforehand that they have one, as they are not required to notify you.
I do wonder if in this instance with Bree's guest if this was a bonafide service animal or if they were just trying to get away with something. A small, aggressive dog in a carrier as a service animal?? Hmmm......
.
Samster said:
I agree with Swirt... It says right in those Q&As regarding service animals that the Federal regs supercede any local & State regulations. If you had someone with a service animal show up at your door, you would not be able to deny them lodging. And you might be surprised that someone with a service animal would not even think about letting you know beforehand that they have one, as they are not required to notify you.
I do wonder if in this instance with Bree's guest if this was a bonafide service animal or if they were just trying to get away with something. A small, aggressive dog in a carrier as a service animal?? Hmmm......
OK, it wasn't MY guest. It was seashanty's guest. I had the lady who thought the charge for the dog was too high.
In trish's case, I think maybe just seeing her dogs might make someone with a service animal change their mind. Why risk it?
.
oops, sorry...
You never know why someone books an accommodation :) Actually, a well trained service animal shouldn't even react to other dogs.
.
Samster said:
oops, sorry...
You never know why someone books an accommodation :) Actually, a well trained service animal shouldn't even react to other dogs.
I have no idea why these guests I just had booked 2 rooms. And we don't really know who slept in which rooms. There were supposed to be 4 of them and 1 canceled. They had to have the one room because of the dog, but they all could have stayed in the one room even with a 4th person.
.
Maybe the extra person(s) didn't like dogs or are allergic to dogs??
.
Samster said:
Maybe the extra person(s) didn't like dogs or are allergic to dogs??
Tough vacation then all traveling in the same car!
.
Yes, that could definitely be a challenge :)
 

muirford

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Wow. So sorry you were caught off guard with this. So glad you posted this, though. It will help us tremendously. And, Swirt, thanks for posting the ADA Regulations.
What struck me was the question in the ADA Regs:
"I have alway had a clearly posted "no pets" policy at my establishment. Do I still have to allow service animals?
The answer in said Regs was:
Yes. A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your no pets policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disablilty. This does not mean you must abandon your "no pet policy" altogether.....
I think the key word here is "MODIFY". Draw your own conclusions. The Regs say that "A service animal is not a pet".
Now I have a question. If one does not allow dogs, and someone checks in with a service animal, am I not allowed to charge for the service animal?
I don't allow animals, so I don't charge other animals.
Am I to understand since I don't have official fees for animals at my inn (because I don't allow them) then I would not be allowed to charge for a service animal?
Riki
.
Don't know. The ADA Regs doesn't address fees, as far as I can see.
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
But, these Regs are so wide open to interpretation. If you look at the BIG picture, how many times will we have guests show up with a dog? It's not something to worry about.
But just know the rules.
We've never had a handicapped couple. But does "handicapped" mean "disabled?"
IF, IF, a couple does want to bring service dog, MOST will let us know beforehand. I think Bree was an exception.
.
trishany said:
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
I may be wrong, but I don't think you are off the hook. These are Federal Regs that supercede any County definitions. If you allow the public into your house in exchange for money, then you are a business. I would have a lawyer make that determination before denying anyone access on the grounds that you might not be a business. ;)
.
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
.
trishany said:
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
I think the rules are such that you cannot deny service for any reason other than the service animal is threatening or disruptive to the other guests. 'Disruptive' not including allergies.
You can certainly explain your territorial dogs or that another guest is present with a dog over which you have no control. Service dogs (REAL service dogs) are very well trained to not 'have' likes and dislikes. They do their job and ignore the rest. So they don't dislike children, but they will protect their person from harm. They don't dislike other dogs, but they will protect their person from harm.
If the service dog is unprovoked and aggressive toward other guests, it has to go. If it howls or damages the rooms, it has to go.
.
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
.
trishany said:
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
You may refuse the dog if it acts aggrssively before the guest takes the room (barking at you, lunging at you or family or other guests, snarling at you & yours, that sort of thing). You may ask the guest to leave if it happens after the room is booked.
The svc dog will not have any interest in you or your kids when it is 'on duty' which means when it is wearing it's halter unless YOU threaten the animal's owner. When the halter is removed, the well-trained dog is 'off duty' and will play just like any other dog.
The service dog is disruptive if IT (not any surrounding dogs/cats/children/wombats) acts aggressively or howls/barks when it is not attending to its person. Some svc dogs will bark to alert their person, but not bark excessively unless their person does not respond.
So, pretty much the only 'disruptive' behavior in your list is the one where the svc dog barks all night. Everything else doesn't count.
Peeing on your carpet is not aggression (it's actually a passive behavior in dogs). Svc animals are trained to do their business on command. Usually 'Get busy' is the command. They go where and when they are told (IF they are properly trained).
If YOUR dogs misbehave, that is YOUR problem! If your kids are a problem (and I know you don't have any so comment not directed at you) then you need to control your child.
Allergies do not count. Not yours, not your kid's, not the other guest's.
.
I think we moved off the subject.
Innkeepers want to know a reason for not allowing service pets.
Your reply is loaded with alot of "if's". A judge does not want to hear: "IF, the 2-year old didn't run, the svc dog would not have bit him/her", or IF the svc dog knew that OUR dogs were just playing, they wouldn't have injured him/her.
I love dogs, had dogs all my life, was trained with dogs. I know dogs. I know service dogs. My two behmouths sleep with us! I can't even watch "Animal Cops" on tv!. lol
But, I don't want them in my beautiful guest rooms. Our guests are paying alot of money to sleep in these rooms, and I don't think it's fair to have them sleep in a room where a dog has been (may they be allergic or whatever).
So, if someone shows up with a "companion" animal, I will graciously tell them that their dog will disrupt the B&B and take it from there.
.
trishany said:
So, if someone shows up with a "companion" animal, I will graciously tell them that their dog will disrupt the B&B and take it from there.
And there you have hit the nail right on the head...you have to do what you think is right and correct. For me, I take the guest and the animal and just wash the bedding the next day. Easy peasy.
.
I think if there was a dog in the room, I would wash more than the bedding. I'm happy it's so easy for you. Dogs do shed, you know and not just on the bedding. And when you have guests coming into that same room in a few hours, and have 4 other rooms to change in THAT same time frame, I would rather not have to clean the dog fur.
.
trishany said:
I think if there was a dog in the room, I would wash more than the bedding. I'm happy it's so easy for you. Dogs do shed, you know and not just on the bedding. And when you have guests coming into that same room in a few hours, and have 4 other rooms to change in THAT same time frame, I would rather not have to clean the dog fur.
I have 7 rooms I swap out while washing bedding that dogs have slept on. Have an allegic guest in my dog room right now, perfectly sneeze free and not a complaint. It can be done if you WANT to do it. If you don't want to, then don't.
.
Dogs - and cats - shed all over humans, too. If you own pets, you are carrying their dander (which causes allergies) and fur/hair (which doesn't) everywhere you go. If you let them into your common areas AT ALL, they are depositing dander there as well. Most people aren't so allergic that a good vacumning won't take care of it.
That's why we tell guests that we have cats, even though they don't go into the common areas or the guest rooms, and some people who are very allergic choose not to stay. I would rather they stay somewhere else than start sneezing here, whether it's because of the cats or because of our brand of tree pollen!
 

Samster

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Messages
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Location
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Wow. So sorry you were caught off guard with this. So glad you posted this, though. It will help us tremendously. And, Swirt, thanks for posting the ADA Regulations.
What struck me was the question in the ADA Regs:
"I have alway had a clearly posted "no pets" policy at my establishment. Do I still have to allow service animals?
The answer in said Regs was:
Yes. A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your no pets policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disablilty. This does not mean you must abandon your "no pet policy" altogether.....
I think the key word here is "MODIFY". Draw your own conclusions. The Regs say that "A service animal is not a pet".
Now I have a question. If one does not allow dogs, and someone checks in with a service animal, am I not allowed to charge for the service animal?
I don't allow animals, so I don't charge other animals.
Am I to understand since I don't have official fees for animals at my inn (because I don't allow them) then I would not be allowed to charge for a service animal?
Riki
.
Don't know. The ADA Regs doesn't address fees, as far as I can see.
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
But, these Regs are so wide open to interpretation. If you look at the BIG picture, how many times will we have guests show up with a dog? It's not something to worry about.
But just know the rules.
We've never had a handicapped couple. But does "handicapped" mean "disabled?"
IF, IF, a couple does want to bring service dog, MOST will let us know beforehand. I think Bree was an exception.
.
trishany said:
I read the first sentence in the Regs, and we're off the hook right there. It states Under the ADA, privately owned BUSINESSES............ . According to our County, we are NOT a business. If you have 5 rooms or more, you're considered a business. We have 4.
I may be wrong, but I don't think you are off the hook. These are Federal Regs that supercede any County definitions. If you allow the public into your house in exchange for money, then you are a business. I would have a lawyer make that determination before denying anyone access on the grounds that you might not be a business. ;)
.
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
.
trishany said:
This is a hot topic!! I'm so glad this was posted. Would never deny any service dog. In fact, one of mine is a service dog (goes to nursing homes, hospitals, etc.). But, this doesn't mean that we can't accept srvc. dogs. Or does it?
Maybe:
some guests are allergic to dogs?
some guests are afraid of dogs?
the service dog is "contrary" to other people?
the service dog doesn't like children?
there are two dogs on the premises who are very territorial?
there is already a guest with a dog who rented a room?
your insurance doesn't cover dog bites?
where will the svc. dog eat and take water. In the room with your carpet and your beautiful wood floors?
My point is that the Fed'l regs are wide open to interpretion by lawyers and judges.
I think the rules are such that you cannot deny service for any reason other than the service animal is threatening or disruptive to the other guests. 'Disruptive' not including allergies.
You can certainly explain your territorial dogs or that another guest is present with a dog over which you have no control. Service dogs (REAL service dogs) are very well trained to not 'have' likes and dislikes. They do their job and ignore the rest. So they don't dislike children, but they will protect their person from harm. They don't dislike other dogs, but they will protect their person from harm.
If the service dog is unprovoked and aggressive toward other guests, it has to go. If it howls or damages the rooms, it has to go.
.
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
.
trishany said:
I seem to be missing a page from the ADA regs. So, if the svc dog is "disruptive", because:
- the svc dog MAY bite the finger off an aggressive and intimidating toddler
- the svc dog smells another dog on the premises and barks all night, keeping other guests awake
- the innkeeper's dogs smell the svc dog, and whine and bark all night, keeping guests awake
- the svc dog makes other guests itch, "disruptively"
- the svc dog pees on your tulips and your expensive rug
- the svc dog wants to say hello to you, but your jealous, big dogs pounce, causing injury
Then, we can refuse the svc dog?
You may refuse the dog if it acts aggrssively before the guest takes the room (barking at you, lunging at you or family or other guests, snarling at you & yours, that sort of thing). You may ask the guest to leave if it happens after the room is booked.
The svc dog will not have any interest in you or your kids when it is 'on duty' which means when it is wearing it's halter unless YOU threaten the animal's owner. When the halter is removed, the well-trained dog is 'off duty' and will play just like any other dog.
The service dog is disruptive if IT (not any surrounding dogs/cats/children/wombats) acts aggressively or howls/barks when it is not attending to its person. Some svc dogs will bark to alert their person, but not bark excessively unless their person does not respond.
So, pretty much the only 'disruptive' behavior in your list is the one where the svc dog barks all night. Everything else doesn't count.
Peeing on your carpet is not aggression (it's actually a passive behavior in dogs). Svc animals are trained to do their business on command. Usually 'Get busy' is the command. They go where and when they are told (IF they are properly trained).
If YOUR dogs misbehave, that is YOUR problem! If your kids are a problem (and I know you don't have any so comment not directed at you) then you need to control your child.
Allergies do not count. Not yours, not your kid's, not the other guest's.
.
I think we moved off the subject.
Innkeepers want to know a reason for not allowing service pets.
Your reply is loaded with alot of "if's". A judge does not want to hear: "IF, the 2-year old didn't run, the svc dog would not have bit him/her", or IF the svc dog knew that OUR dogs were just playing, they wouldn't have injured him/her.
I love dogs, had dogs all my life, was trained with dogs. I know dogs. I know service dogs. My two behmouths sleep with us! I can't even watch "Animal Cops" on tv!. lol
But, I don't want them in my beautiful guest rooms. Our guests are paying alot of money to sleep in these rooms, and I don't think it's fair to have them sleep in a room where a dog has been (may they be allergic or whatever).
So, if someone shows up with a "companion" animal, I will graciously tell them that their dog will disrupt the B&B and take it from there.
.
trishany said:
So, if someone shows up with a "companion" animal, I will graciously tell them that their dog will disrupt the B&B and take it from there.
And there you have hit the nail right on the head...you have to do what you think is right and correct. For me, I take the guest and the animal and just wash the bedding the next day. Easy peasy.
.
I think if there was a dog in the room, I would wash more than the bedding. I'm happy it's so easy for you. Dogs do shed, you know and not just on the bedding. And when you have guests coming into that same room in a few hours, and have 4 other rooms to change in THAT same time frame, I would rather not have to clean the dog fur.
.
trishany said:
I think if there was a dog in the room, I would wash more than the bedding. I'm happy it's so easy for you. Dogs do shed, you know and not just on the bedding. And when you have guests coming into that same room in a few hours, and have 4 other rooms to change in THAT same time frame, I would rather not have to clean the dog fur.
I have 7 rooms I swap out while washing bedding that dogs have slept on. Have an allegic guest in my dog room right now, perfectly sneeze free and not a complaint. It can be done if you WANT to do it. If you don't want to, then don't.
.
Dogs - and cats - shed all over humans, too. If you own pets, you are carrying their dander (which causes allergies) and fur/hair (which doesn't) everywhere you go. If you let them into your common areas AT ALL, they are depositing dander there as well. Most people aren't so allergic that a good vacumning won't take care of it.
That's why we tell guests that we have cats, even though they don't go into the common areas or the guest rooms, and some people who are very allergic choose not to stay. I would rather they stay somewhere else than start sneezing here, whether it's because of the cats or because of our brand of tree pollen!
.
Same here...we're sure to let folks know about our pooches. They are not allowed into our common areas as a rule, but one of my dogs must have been Houdini in one of his former lives and has been known to bust out of our quarters.
This hasn't happened yet with guests in the house. Of course, I grab him right away!! I had a friend of mine's daughter stay here & she has a little girl who is highly allergic to all animals...they stayed in our house next door. We do have that option here. But they still eat breakfast in our dining room. I am a freak about vacuuming all the time and we have plantation shutters in our common areas, no drapes. They get dusted quite often.
I am very allergic to cats but have had no problems at inns where the cats are kept in the innkeepers quarters.
 

YellowSocks

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Yes, we're always sure to let people know about the ds4x2... you never know when those allergies may kick in!
=)
Kk.
 
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