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Marketing to Gen X vs Baby Boomers and Gen Y

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JBloggs

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As many of you heard at (name removed), new research on travel behavior has led us to the conclusion of focusing our campaigns on the Gen X families within a day’s drive to (our state). Not only do these families spend more money on travel than their Baby Boomer counterparts, their consumer confidence is rising at a faster pace.
From JB - I don't have the study, I did a google and found this fyi. If anyone wants to read digest and report back their findings in a nut shell we would appreciate it, or any other studies on this subject.
If this is true, should we be focusing some/or more of our marketing efforts toward Gen X? I believe so. I believe the Gen X are the package takers/add-ons (this is my experience here in my location, at my B&B, might be diff where you are and how you PRESENT Your B&B)
  1. Gen X being more technology minded - more likely to research what there is to do to extend their stay - to go off the beaten path - to order the add ons or dinner packages -perhaps to appreciate the hard foot work done by the Innkeeper to provide something to interesting to see and do in the area? More likely to read your blog and calendar of local events. Gen X being 25-39.
  2. Gen Y being 18-24 (I won't purposely market to that age group and in fact prefer to NOT have Gen Y here at this doiley-laden gnome guarded unhip B&B, they arrive late - stay in their room and check out - do not $ toward the local economy - will grab McDonald's to bring back to their room - College kids or young marrieds low on cash) :)
  3. Baby Boomer being 55-64 on the verge of retirement or early retirement, sometimes pinching pennies as they drive their Mercedes to our B&B. They typically do not purchase add ons or packages here.
In my experience here from the past year - which was not like most years so I have to go with the change in tide and market toward that - Generally speaking: Baby Boomers were the one nighters - ie anniversaries, in transit, here for an event. Gen X were the multiple night stays - cultural tourism, wine festivals, Gen Y were the internet hook ups or wedding nights. So overall Gen Y brought the least amount of $ to the area - oftentimes their room even paid for by someone else. Baby Boomers scouting the area for retirement, being super thrifty perhaps skipping a meal or bottle of wine at dinner, Gen X adding on additional nights and meals and ordering that bottle of wine, souvenirs, etc.
Please share your ideas/thoughts on this subject that greatly impacts how we operate our businesses.

 

EmptyNest

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I haven't heard the term gen x'er and gen y used in ages. Is that still politically correct???
 

Morticia

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Baby Boomers are my core biz. They are both the bread & butter and the one nighters. The Gen X'ers DO read the blog, the website, etc and DO know more about what there is to do before they arrive. They are just as likely to ask for discounts, more likely to book the pkgs I have on offer and neither more nor less likely to be good or bad as a guest.
Rarely get Gen Y unless they always stayed at small inns with their parents. Don't market to them as they don't 'fit' into the overall 'plan' of having brekkie early and check-outs at 11.
Our young parents are here to get away from kids, they rarely bring them along. Altho we did just have 2 families with kids here a few weeks ago who really seemed to like the atmosphere. More like 'Grannie's' house than a hotel. Relaxed, casual, no need to watch the kid every moment for fear they would go out the lobby door with a stranger. And we have toys.
I think market to the younger crowd requires that the house be 'wired.' ie- TV's, internet access, etc. Altho, with more people watching DVD's on their computers and watching TV online, it seems that was a short-lived trend.
 

bbinnsitters

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JB, I believe you are spot on with all these descriptions of the different groups. The Gen Y isn't going to be putting any $ into anything until they have paying jobs! Gen X-ers are settled in their careers and may still be dinks (double income no kids) - and may stay that way until the economy improves - they think they have $ to burn. Let them spend it on vacations - market to them!
 

JBloggs

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JB, I believe you are spot on with all these descriptions of the different groups. The Gen Y isn't going to be putting any $ into anything until they have paying jobs! Gen X-ers are settled in their careers and may still be dinks (double income no kids) - and may stay that way until the economy improves - they think they have $ to burn. Let them spend it on vacations - market to them!.
suellen222 said:
JB, I believe you are spot on with all these descriptions of the different groups. The Gen Y isn't going to be putting any $ into anything until they have paying jobs! Gen X-ers are settled in their careers and may still be dinks (double income no kids) - and may stay that way until the economy improves - they think they have $ to burn. Let them spend it on vacations - market to them!
So the ideas for marketing to them are...?
As I was typing this I had outlook flash a B&B org newsletter with headlines "B&B draws scrapbooking enthusiasts"
See to me there is nothing in this $, to get a bunch of women (presumably) who try to pack four to a room and bring their own potluck casseroles and kitchen access to reheat or dish up the food and take over every inch of the B&B is NOT my cup of tea for a B&B. article here in news online
Of course if the owners are into it and just want to use it as an extension of their places and part of their 'thing' then sobeit. Again, scrapbookers although spend hundreds to thousands on their supplies and hobby are not out to spend money at a B&B, they want to save money.
This seems to be very outdated trend as murder mystery weekends, surely we have some new trends to focus on?
(I am thinking aloud on these working for 2010 marketing) :)
 

Morticia

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JB, I believe you are spot on with all these descriptions of the different groups. The Gen Y isn't going to be putting any $ into anything until they have paying jobs! Gen X-ers are settled in their careers and may still be dinks (double income no kids) - and may stay that way until the economy improves - they think they have $ to burn. Let them spend it on vacations - market to them!.
suellen222 said:
JB, I believe you are spot on with all these descriptions of the different groups. The Gen Y isn't going to be putting any $ into anything until they have paying jobs! Gen X-ers are settled in their careers and may still be dinks (double income no kids) - and may stay that way until the economy improves - they think they have $ to burn. Let them spend it on vacations - market to them!
So the ideas for marketing to them are...?
As I was typing this I had outlook flash a B&B org newsletter with headlines "B&B draws scrapbooking enthusiasts"
See to me there is nothing in this $, to get a bunch of women (presumably) who try to pack four to a room and bring their own potluck casseroles and kitchen access to reheat or dish up the food and take over every inch of the B&B is NOT my cup of tea for a B&B. article here in news online
Of course if the owners are into it and just want to use it as an extension of their places and part of their 'thing' then sobeit. Again, scrapbookers although spend hundreds to thousands on their supplies and hobby are not out to spend money at a B&B, they want to save money.
This seems to be very outdated trend as murder mystery weekends, surely we have some new trends to focus on?
(I am thinking aloud on these working for 2010 marketing) :)
.
Different ideas would be great. But I do know these targeted weekends bring in guests in the off season. Yes, they want discounts, but you have to be firm and say how many per room and what the price is (usually per person) and what the restrictions are. It does depend on the area you're in and your level of tolerance for antics.
If I had more room I would definitely try to focus on this market. Here's why...they are loyal. If you provide them with clean, comfortable accommodations and workspace and maybe lunch or 'midnight snacks' they return year after year. Let's say you can get around $99-$129 per person for a usually dead weekend. They book the whole house. For me, that could be $1400+. Not bad in Feb or March.
But I don't have the workspace for that many guests to spread out.
Whenever we have a crafting weekend in town, the cheap rooms go first. Absolutely. But that goes back, I think, to what we talked about recently...how much money is at your disposal before you need 'permission' to spend more. The supplies are expensive and no one wants to do without their supplies, so lodging and meals are where they cut. That's why a flexible pricing plan for these groups helps. Hotels deeply discount these groups, shaving 50% off room rates sometimes.
 

wendydk

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JB, I believe you are spot on with all these descriptions of the different groups. The Gen Y isn't going to be putting any $ into anything until they have paying jobs! Gen X-ers are settled in their careers and may still be dinks (double income no kids) - and may stay that way until the economy improves - they think they have $ to burn. Let them spend it on vacations - market to them!.
suellen222 said:
JB, I believe you are spot on with all these descriptions of the different groups. The Gen Y isn't going to be putting any $ into anything until they have paying jobs! Gen X-ers are settled in their careers and may still be dinks (double income no kids) - and may stay that way until the economy improves - they think they have $ to burn. Let them spend it on vacations - market to them!
So the ideas for marketing to them are...?
As I was typing this I had outlook flash a B&B org newsletter with headlines "B&B draws scrapbooking enthusiasts"
See to me there is nothing in this $, to get a bunch of women (presumably) who try to pack four to a room and bring their own potluck casseroles and kitchen access to reheat or dish up the food and take over every inch of the B&B is NOT my cup of tea for a B&B. article here in news online
Of course if the owners are into it and just want to use it as an extension of their places and part of their 'thing' then sobeit. Again, scrapbookers although spend hundreds to thousands on their supplies and hobby are not out to spend money at a B&B, they want to save money.
This seems to be very outdated trend as murder mystery weekends, surely we have some new trends to focus on?
(I am thinking aloud on these working for 2010 marketing) :)
.
In Michigan, there are two or three B&B's that rely soley on scrapbookers, and they are REALLY hurting right now. It's a trend on the way downhill.
 

Morticia

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JB, I believe you are spot on with all these descriptions of the different groups. The Gen Y isn't going to be putting any $ into anything until they have paying jobs! Gen X-ers are settled in their careers and may still be dinks (double income no kids) - and may stay that way until the economy improves - they think they have $ to burn. Let them spend it on vacations - market to them!.
suellen222 said:
JB, I believe you are spot on with all these descriptions of the different groups. The Gen Y isn't going to be putting any $ into anything until they have paying jobs! Gen X-ers are settled in their careers and may still be dinks (double income no kids) - and may stay that way until the economy improves - they think they have $ to burn. Let them spend it on vacations - market to them!
So the ideas for marketing to them are...?
As I was typing this I had outlook flash a B&B org newsletter with headlines "B&B draws scrapbooking enthusiasts"
See to me there is nothing in this $, to get a bunch of women (presumably) who try to pack four to a room and bring their own potluck casseroles and kitchen access to reheat or dish up the food and take over every inch of the B&B is NOT my cup of tea for a B&B. article here in news online
Of course if the owners are into it and just want to use it as an extension of their places and part of their 'thing' then sobeit. Again, scrapbookers although spend hundreds to thousands on their supplies and hobby are not out to spend money at a B&B, they want to save money.
This seems to be very outdated trend as murder mystery weekends, surely we have some new trends to focus on?
(I am thinking aloud on these working for 2010 marketing) :)
.
There is a lot of info in that article on how women veiw themselves and what a potential marketing pitch has to look like. This was ALWAYS an issue in VT, and probably is everywhere...guys go to deer camp without a backward glance because the 'home' in not their responsibility. Whenever the wives of said guys wanted a weekend away, they had to get 'permission.' In spite of hunting licenses costing $x and all the gear costing $y, the wives were told there was 'no money' for you to 'gad about.' (I am not kidding, here, btw.)
My friends had to arrange childcare even tho the fathers of these kids were home when they wanted to travel.
For SOME women to go away, they have to have a reason. They cant 'just go.' They are still living lives of quiet desperation. I think that's what this B&B is focused on and catering to.
No need to feel 'guilty' as you will spend the whole weekend focused on making something for your family. (Whether your family gives a care about the scrapbooks or not.)
 

cherry64

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As a Gen Y'er (28, so kinda both X and Y, depending on who picks the start dates) I sometimes just shake my head at you old people.

But I'm not your normal twenty-something. So I understand the stigma that comes with being youngish.
 

wendydk

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I love our Generation "X" and (especially) the "Y" guests. I send the snooty oldest generation to the Gingerbread Mansion down the road, they're a perfect fit for each other.
 

Morticia

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As a Gen Y'er (28, so kinda both X and Y, depending on who picks the start dates) I sometimes just shake my head at you old people.

But I'm not your normal twenty-something. So I understand the stigma that comes with being youngish..
cherry64 said:
As a Gen Y'er (28, so kinda both X and Y, depending on who picks the start dates) I sometimes just shake my head at you old people.

But I'm not your normal twenty-something. So I understand the stigma that comes with being youngish.
Why do you shake your head? What am I doing/saying that is offensive? Seriously, tell me.
 

bbinnsitters

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JB, I believe you are spot on with all these descriptions of the different groups. The Gen Y isn't going to be putting any $ into anything until they have paying jobs! Gen X-ers are settled in their careers and may still be dinks (double income no kids) - and may stay that way until the economy improves - they think they have $ to burn. Let them spend it on vacations - market to them!.
suellen222 said:
JB, I believe you are spot on with all these descriptions of the different groups. The Gen Y isn't going to be putting any $ into anything until they have paying jobs! Gen X-ers are settled in their careers and may still be dinks (double income no kids) - and may stay that way until the economy improves - they think they have $ to burn. Let them spend it on vacations - market to them!
So the ideas for marketing to them are...?
As I was typing this I had outlook flash a B&B org newsletter with headlines "B&B draws scrapbooking enthusiasts"
See to me there is nothing in this $, to get a bunch of women (presumably) who try to pack four to a room and bring their own potluck casseroles and kitchen access to reheat or dish up the food and take over every inch of the B&B is NOT my cup of tea for a B&B. article here in news online
Of course if the owners are into it and just want to use it as an extension of their places and part of their 'thing' then sobeit. Again, scrapbookers although spend hundreds to thousands on their supplies and hobby are not out to spend money at a B&B, they want to save money.
This seems to be very outdated trend as murder mystery weekends, surely we have some new trends to focus on?
(I am thinking aloud on these working for 2010 marketing) :)
.
Are there any quilt shows in your area? I know women who like to travel for that. How 'bout just marketing a "girls weekend" getaway. Who needs a reason, you just want to get away - from the husband and kids! If I had a husband who hunted, fished, etc., you can bet I would be finding an excuse to take the same amount of time away!
 

egoodell

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I have the same results as you. Gen X is coming here to get a break from work - and they usually stay two nights and about 75 % or more add on a wine tour. Baby Boomers come here, often stay two nights, and about 25% add on a wine tour.
Since I have the wine tours I get a lot all over the map booking the wine tours from other hotels, B&Bs, drive in for the day, people. But again, Gen Y will often book the limos as they appear cheaper (Starting at $49 sounds a lot cheaper than $125 per person until the end of the tour with all their hidden addons like "limo driver gratuity" etc.)
I don't want any kinds of groups since I only have 2 rooms. I won't want them even when I have five since they are too much work and never want to spend any money.
I cater to the couples and love doing them. I point out they can stay with me and have a wine tour for the price they used to pay for one airline ticket alone for their weekend getaways.
And the added security right now for flying is going to make more people want to drive, I think.
RIki
RIki
 

cherry64

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As a Gen Y'er (28, so kinda both X and Y, depending on who picks the start dates) I sometimes just shake my head at you old people.

But I'm not your normal twenty-something. So I understand the stigma that comes with being youngish..
cherry64 said:
As a Gen Y'er (28, so kinda both X and Y, depending on who picks the start dates) I sometimes just shake my head at you old people.

But I'm not your normal twenty-something. So I understand the stigma that comes with being youngish.
Why do you shake your head? What am I doing/saying that is offensive? Seriously, tell me.
.
Morticia said:
cherry64 said:
As a Gen Y'er (28, so kinda both X and Y, depending on who picks the start dates) I sometimes just shake my head at you old people.

But I'm not your normal twenty-something. So I understand the stigma that comes with being youngish.
Why do you shake your head? What am I doing/saying that is offensive? Seriously, tell me.
I'm not really offended.
There is just a touch of prejudice against young people at B&B's. Little comments about keeping a close eye on the college aged kids or young marrieds. I've personally been treated poorly by innkeepers because of my age, so I am more aware of it than others might be. I've gotten use to it.
I don't get marketed to because of my age. Even though, if I start liking B&B's at a young age I will spend more money and time at B&B's over the course of my life time.
 

JBloggs

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JB, I believe you are spot on with all these descriptions of the different groups. The Gen Y isn't going to be putting any $ into anything until they have paying jobs! Gen X-ers are settled in their careers and may still be dinks (double income no kids) - and may stay that way until the economy improves - they think they have $ to burn. Let them spend it on vacations - market to them!.
suellen222 said:
JB, I believe you are spot on with all these descriptions of the different groups. The Gen Y isn't going to be putting any $ into anything until they have paying jobs! Gen X-ers are settled in their careers and may still be dinks (double income no kids) - and may stay that way until the economy improves - they think they have $ to burn. Let them spend it on vacations - market to them!
So the ideas for marketing to them are...?
As I was typing this I had outlook flash a B&B org newsletter with headlines "B&B draws scrapbooking enthusiasts"
See to me there is nothing in this $, to get a bunch of women (presumably) who try to pack four to a room and bring their own potluck casseroles and kitchen access to reheat or dish up the food and take over every inch of the B&B is NOT my cup of tea for a B&B. article here in news online
Of course if the owners are into it and just want to use it as an extension of their places and part of their 'thing' then sobeit. Again, scrapbookers although spend hundreds to thousands on their supplies and hobby are not out to spend money at a B&B, they want to save money.
This seems to be very outdated trend as murder mystery weekends, surely we have some new trends to focus on?
(I am thinking aloud on these working for 2010 marketing) :)
.
Different ideas would be great. But I do know these targeted weekends bring in guests in the off season. Yes, they want discounts, but you have to be firm and say how many per room and what the price is (usually per person) and what the restrictions are. It does depend on the area you're in and your level of tolerance for antics.
If I had more room I would definitely try to focus on this market. Here's why...they are loyal. If you provide them with clean, comfortable accommodations and workspace and maybe lunch or 'midnight snacks' they return year after year. Let's say you can get around $99-$129 per person for a usually dead weekend. They book the whole house. For me, that could be $1400+. Not bad in Feb or March.
But I don't have the workspace for that many guests to spread out.
Whenever we have a crafting weekend in town, the cheap rooms go first. Absolutely. But that goes back, I think, to what we talked about recently...how much money is at your disposal before you need 'permission' to spend more. The supplies are expensive and no one wants to do without their supplies, so lodging and meals are where they cut. That's why a flexible pricing plan for these groups helps. Hotels deeply discount these groups, shaving 50% off room rates sometimes.
.
Mort do you really think you would get $99-129 per person? They will not each book their own room, that is why I was saying pack four to a room. In the past this has been the scenario, and they will look for Inns with two beds per room for that reason. Have you had one of these weekends book before, can you share your experience in that?
 

egoodell

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As a Gen Y'er (28, so kinda both X and Y, depending on who picks the start dates) I sometimes just shake my head at you old people.

But I'm not your normal twenty-something. So I understand the stigma that comes with being youngish..
cherry64 said:
As a Gen Y'er (28, so kinda both X and Y, depending on who picks the start dates) I sometimes just shake my head at you old people.

But I'm not your normal twenty-something. So I understand the stigma that comes with being youngish.
Why shake your head? The Gen Y are the ones that don't want to spend money, so we aren't interested in them. The Baby Boomers in some instances are not spending the money, so some are not marketing to them. It's not a stigma it's a fact when we come to pay our bills.
Has nothing to do with our age as business owners.
If Gen X was spending the money, we'd market to them.
For me Gen X and then Baby Boomers are spending the money. That's why I'm not interested in Gen Y.
Riki
 

JBloggs

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As a Gen Y'er (28, so kinda both X and Y, depending on who picks the start dates) I sometimes just shake my head at you old people.

But I'm not your normal twenty-something. So I understand the stigma that comes with being youngish..
And so cherry64 is there something to add to the marketing of "YOU" I am a Gen Xer by the way, but maybe an old fogey to you Gen Y. LOL :)
 

JBloggs

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JB, I believe you are spot on with all these descriptions of the different groups. The Gen Y isn't going to be putting any $ into anything until they have paying jobs! Gen X-ers are settled in their careers and may still be dinks (double income no kids) - and may stay that way until the economy improves - they think they have $ to burn. Let them spend it on vacations - market to them!.
suellen222 said:
JB, I believe you are spot on with all these descriptions of the different groups. The Gen Y isn't going to be putting any $ into anything until they have paying jobs! Gen X-ers are settled in their careers and may still be dinks (double income no kids) - and may stay that way until the economy improves - they think they have $ to burn. Let them spend it on vacations - market to them!
So the ideas for marketing to them are...?
As I was typing this I had outlook flash a B&B org newsletter with headlines "B&B draws scrapbooking enthusiasts"
See to me there is nothing in this $, to get a bunch of women (presumably) who try to pack four to a room and bring their own potluck casseroles and kitchen access to reheat or dish up the food and take over every inch of the B&B is NOT my cup of tea for a B&B. article here in news online
Of course if the owners are into it and just want to use it as an extension of their places and part of their 'thing' then sobeit. Again, scrapbookers although spend hundreds to thousands on their supplies and hobby are not out to spend money at a B&B, they want to save money.
This seems to be very outdated trend as murder mystery weekends, surely we have some new trends to focus on?
(I am thinking aloud on these working for 2010 marketing) :)
.
Are there any quilt shows in your area? I know women who like to travel for that. How 'bout just marketing a "girls weekend" getaway. Who needs a reason, you just want to get away - from the husband and kids! If I had a husband who hunted, fished, etc., you can bet I would be finding an excuse to take the same amount of time away!
.
suellen222 said:
Are there any quilt shows in your area? I know women who like to travel for that. How 'bout just marketing a "girls weekend" getaway. Who needs a reason, you just want to get away - from the husband and kids! If I had a husband who hunted, fished, etc., you can bet I would be finding an excuse to take the same amount of time away!
Okay, I am a bit confused. Looking at marketing to Gen X. Like the orig post suggested. We do need a "reason" it is called marketing, it needs to have some sort of grab to get the guests in, otherwise we would not market at all. Just trying to clarify if I was too wordy or confusing.
So any ideas specific to Gen X?? Not rated "G" for general audience, specifically to Gen X. Again, not an economy weekend where we pack ladies into a room, actually trying to MAKE money on this.
 

egoodell

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As a Gen Y'er (28, so kinda both X and Y, depending on who picks the start dates) I sometimes just shake my head at you old people.

But I'm not your normal twenty-something. So I understand the stigma that comes with being youngish..
cherry64 said:
As a Gen Y'er (28, so kinda both X and Y, depending on who picks the start dates) I sometimes just shake my head at you old people.

But I'm not your normal twenty-something. So I understand the stigma that comes with being youngish.
Why do you shake your head? What am I doing/saying that is offensive? Seriously, tell me.
.
Morticia said:
cherry64 said:
As a Gen Y'er (28, so kinda both X and Y, depending on who picks the start dates) I sometimes just shake my head at you old people.

But I'm not your normal twenty-something. So I understand the stigma that comes with being youngish.
Why do you shake your head? What am I doing/saying that is offensive? Seriously, tell me.
I'm not really offended.
There is just a touch of prejudice against young people at B&B's. Little comments about keeping a close eye on the college aged kids or young marrieds. I've personally been treated poorly by innkeepers because of my age, so I am more aware of it than others might be. I've gotten use to it.
I don't get marketed to because of my age. Even though, if I start liking B&B's at a young age I will spend more money and time at B&B's over the course of my life time.
.
cherry64 said:
Morticia said:
cherry64 said:
As a Gen Y'er (28, so kinda both X and Y, depending on who picks the start dates) I sometimes just shake my head at you old people.

But I'm not your normal twenty-something. So I understand the stigma that comes with being youngish.
Why do you shake your head? What am I doing/saying that is offensive? Seriously, tell me.
I'm not really offended.
There is just a touch of prejudice against young people at B&B's. Little comments about keeping a close eye on the college aged kids or young marrieds. I've personally been treated poorly by innkeepers because of my age, so I am more aware of it than others might be. I've gotten use to it.
I don't get marketed to because of my age. Even though, if I start liking B&B's at a young age I will spend more money and time at B&B's over the course of my life time.
Talk to us after you have opened your B&B and have had some of these groups stay at your inn, and see who your best guests are and where you make your money. Every generation has complained that they don't get respect when they are young.
As I said, we are talking about where our money comes from. Mine does not from Gen Y . Period. Has nothing to do with anything else.
Riki
 

JBloggs

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As a Gen Y'er (28, so kinda both X and Y, depending on who picks the start dates) I sometimes just shake my head at you old people.

But I'm not your normal twenty-something. So I understand the stigma that comes with being youngish..
cherry64 said:
As a Gen Y'er (28, so kinda both X and Y, depending on who picks the start dates) I sometimes just shake my head at you old people.

But I'm not your normal twenty-something. So I understand the stigma that comes with being youngish.
Why do you shake your head? What am I doing/saying that is offensive? Seriously, tell me.
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Morticia said:
cherry64 said:
As a Gen Y'er (28, so kinda both X and Y, depending on who picks the start dates) I sometimes just shake my head at you old people.

But I'm not your normal twenty-something. So I understand the stigma that comes with being youngish.
Why do you shake your head? What am I doing/saying that is offensive? Seriously, tell me.
I'm not really offended.
There is just a touch of prejudice against young people at B&B's. Little comments about keeping a close eye on the college aged kids or young marrieds. I've personally been treated poorly by innkeepers because of my age, so I am more aware of it than others might be. I've gotten use to it.
I don't get marketed to because of my age. Even though, if I start liking B&B's at a young age I will spend more money and time at B&B's over the course of my life time.
.
cherry64 said:
Morticia said:
cherry64 said:
As a Gen Y'er (28, so kinda both X and Y, depending on who picks the start dates) I sometimes just shake my head at you old people.

But I'm not your normal twenty-something. So I understand the stigma that comes with being youngish.
Why do you shake your head? What am I doing/saying that is offensive? Seriously, tell me.
I'm not really offended.
There is just a touch of prejudice against young people at B&B's. Little comments about keeping a close eye on the college aged kids or young marrieds. I've personally been treated poorly by innkeepers because of my age, so I am more aware of it than others might be. I've gotten use to it.
I don't get marketed to because of my age. Even though, if I start liking B&B's at a young age I will spend more money and time at B&B's over the course of my life time.
Do you own a B&B or are you an aspiring? College aged kids are what I described in my post, not the ones who spend money and stimulate the local economy. They want something hip - not a place filled with antiques. That is what "they" say repeatedly. If they wanted an old house full of antiques then my TARGET would be right on them. This is a discussion about marketing, I didn't invent that college age kids have no money.
This is a marketing thread, if anyone has idea to market to Gen X please share them before I beat my HEAD against the wall.
 
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